#1
Okay when someone says "learn ionian scales," what exactly should i learn, because there are so many. Do I need to be able to know all the notes of, lets say C# in the Ionian all along the fretboard or just a few of the patterns?
#3
I would say at least learn the root, 3rd, 5th, and octave. I like to learn all of the notes. It's kinda like you have the odds stacked in your favor because you can choose any one of those notes to play to add color the the song,rhythm etc. Check out my profile, the first song uses a lot of Ionian in it.
#4
And you must use a maj7th or else u really miss out on the Ionian character, and it will just sound major.

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#5
Since the original Ionian mode is based around the natural diatonic scale of C, it can be pretty tricky on guitar to learn entirely, but its a joy to improvise with on a piano since its just all the white keys
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Learn where every note of the scale is everywhere on the fretboard.
I've always wondered, for an improvisational approach, wouldn't it be better to learn a moveable shape up and down and learn which interval each note in the shape makes with the root of the shape?

I've always held the contention that which note you pick (A or G or D or whatever) won't matter, but what does matter is the context and interval this note makes with the rest of the song (melodic or harmonic). Learning all the notes of the fretboard seems like a slower process than learning shapes.
#7
I've always wondered, for an improvisational approach, wouldn't it be better to learn a moveable shape up and down and learn which interval each note in the shape makes with the root of the shape?

That's how I've always done it! (Not that im any good at improvising lol )
#8
Damn, I forgot to answer the T/S

Learn 2 or 3 ionian moveable "shapes" and learn your theory. These in combination will allow you to use "ionian" (best to call it the major scale) up and down the fretboard.
#9
Listen to a chord and play a melody over that by ear. Don't think in patterns. You'll hear what notes sound good if you listen carefully. Also try singing the notes
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#10
Quote by demonofthenight
Damn, I forgot to answer the T/S

Learn 2 or 3 ionian moveable "shapes" and learn your theory. These in combination will allow you to use "ionian" (best to call it the major scale) up and down the fretboard.


This is the argument i pull out when people just say learn theory, glad to see someone else thinks so. I love theory, it's really interesting and helps with your composition but theres no reason not to learn a few shapes so you can noodle and stumble onto things you like the sound of.