#1
Hey,

my guitar and I, we have a problem. Kinda.
Whenever I sit down, thinking of nothing, just letting it flow...
great things happen. Ideas come crawling, I lose myself... damn
it's fun! When I listen to it afterwards or show it around resonance
is great, people like it and so do I.

Now to the problem... goddamnit I can't work with the stuff
I'm creating! I never get a song outta it. I have like 20 song Ideas
both with vocal melodies sitting around but I never seem to find the
feeling again because when I actually try to -work- with it I have
all kinds of stuff in my head and not that looseness I had when I
created it in the first place. Am I alone with this? Sounds familiar to anyone?
Jeez it's driving me crazy!

I guess we all know those magical jam sessions where everything's
perfect just to be disappointed the next time you try to play it. Cuz
the magic is gone and 'work' took its space.

Any advice?

(To get an idea what I'm talking about: this (3mb avi). Happened once, never
sounds right afterwards.)
#2
give it time, takes me like a month before i get all the riffs i need and developed properly together, dont rush yourself thats probably your problem, listen to what you have and then think where you want it to go, not on the guitar or whatever but in your head, then put it on your instrument of choice.
#3
Theory, my friend, is your best friend.

First learn all the basics. All around the internet, there will be at least one good article on every site. Theres about 5 or 6 good articles on UG in our coloum section.

With your new arsenal of theory, study some songs. Study their progressions and how they're put together and the way the drums lay down a beat.

Learn to write melodies, as in go to a library and type "melody writing" into the search terminals. I know what you're writing is great, but you need to learn the classical conventions of writing if you want those melodies to be (more) singable. It'd be nice if there was a free melody writing article on the internet (so we don't have to take a hike to the library), but so far () the ones I've found suck.

Than you might want to learn counterpoint. It's handy if you have 2 riffs and a singing melody and you want to play them on top of each other without causing clashes or de-individualisation.

Remember, writing music is a skill, NOT an inherit ability. You will gradually get better at writing.
#4
Quote by demonofthenight
Theory, my friend, is your best friend.

First learn all the basics. All around the internet, there will be at least one good article on every site. Theres about 5 or 6 good articles on UG in our coloum section.

With your new arsenal of theory, study some songs. Study their progressions and how they're put together and the way the drums lay down a beat.

Learn to write melodies, as in go to a library and type "melody writing" into the search terminals. I know what you're writing is great, but you need to learn the classical conventions of writing if you want those melodies to be (more) singable. It'd be nice if there was a free melody writing article on the internet (so we don't have to take a hike to the library), but so far () the ones I've found suck.

Than you might want to learn counterpoint. It's handy if you have 2 riffs and a singing melody and you want to play them on top of each other without causing clashes or de-individualisation.

Remember, writing music is a skill, NOT an inherit ability. You will gradually get better at writing.


+1
#5
the first verse flows better than the 2nd and 3rd......wait it wasn't a song

Seriously I had/have got the same problem, i've tried a few things to see if it helps. I also find it hard to replicate the same feeling you have when your on a roll and things are clicking in a particular song. Recently I've tried either writing down what I was thinking about (motivation for writing the song) at the time, or even naming the song, even when it's not complete. I did this in a hope that once I picked the song back up to work on it, a few minutes of working with it and I would have the same ideas come flooding back. I tend to give the rough tune a name and a feeling/reason for writing it if possible. For example most recent ideas i've written down and recorded i've called "brooding/melancholy/2 - Make time for what you love, everything else comes second". This helps me to pick up the music again and think ok what it all about, I told my brother about this and he said I was full of ****, lol but it works for me.

Also i've started trying record as much as I can (without forcing ideas) in one sitting. The more you have recorded/written down, then the more ideas you have captured and it should make it easier for you to replicate the writing style you had for it.
#6
Same problem here. Still trying to figure it out.
-When you have eliminated all which is impossible,then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

-PRS Tremonti SE with SD SH-1 '59 (Neck) and SD Distortion (Bridge)

-Schecter C-1 Elite

-Line 6 PODXT

-Floorboard