#1
so im gonna build my own guitar . i know everything else but the paint. i have i got this right?, is this how you would do it?. sand it put the colour of the paint on, lots of coats of clear enamel about 6 - 7 then polish it, is this everything or have i missed something out, i probably have lol

thanks


oh and what type of paint do you use, do you use spray paint?
Last edited by shredda2084 at Nov 18, 2008,
#4
Sanding sealer over the bare wood, sanded to P220.

Prime it properly, then sand to P320-400.

Apply base coats of colour.

If you are using a non metallic, solid colour and you want to add another coat, you CAN wet sand with wet P500, on a block, carefully.

Apply further colour coat.

Wet sand again if you want.

Then apply clear coat. Try and use Automotive 2 Pack clear if you can, as it dries and cures much quicker (24 hours in good conditions).

If you use any other clear, you need to leave it about 6 weeks to cure, before you even bother wet sanding and buffing.

If you use a metallic colour DO NOT wet sand the paint. You have to clear it first.

If you are adding artwork, protect the basecoat with an Intercoat Clear.
#5
is the primer like the under coat?
is the bass coat, just the color you are gonna use?
and could you go into detail with the last 3 lines, please.

thanks
#6
Quote by shredda2084
is the primer like the under coat?
is the bass coat, just the color you are gonna use?
and could you go into detail with the last 3 lines, please.

thanks


Yes, Primer is undercoat.

Base coat is the colour you are using, but it is called a base coat, as it is the colour you would apply first, if you are using two or more colours. For example, if you were masking out areas, then the basecoat, is the one you would want to see, after the masking is removed.

Regular rattle can clear coats; Enamel, Nitrocellulose etc, take a very long time to harden fully. If you wet sand the clear coat and polish it, before it has fully hardened, after a while the clear will go dull and lumpy as it cures.

2 Part epoxy clear coats, like they use on cars, is a chemical reaction, that sets, hard in about 24 hours at 70F. These are best.

Metallic colours, have very small flakes of metal in them, that stand up and catch the light.
If you sand that surface, you will flatten the paint, taking off the flakes and ruining the finish.

Metallics need to be protected with a clear coat. The clear will fill any orange peel (bumps) on the paint, so then you only have to deal with any on the clear coat.

Intercoat, is like paint without the colour. It is a clear coat, but isn't a finish clear coat like lacquer is.

If you do a solid or metallic base coat and then you want to add, airbrush work, or flames or any design over the top, you first spray Intercoat Clear over the base coat, to protect it from your hands, tape and any **** ups you might make on the artwork.

Then you wet sand it after it has dried, and then add your artwork or flames or pinstriping etc.

Use it as required.

Then you can clear coat over that.
#8
Quote by shredda2084
thanks a lot dude, you helped a lot, very much appreciated


Your very welcome.

If you have access to a compressor. Get a mini Jet, Gravity feed spray gun, with a 0.8 or 1.2mm tip.

Use it for your colour and clear coats (unless you are using metallic, in which case, get one just for clear coats).

Adjust the nozzle and paint so that you get a good, 4 inch wide patter, with the gun 4 inches from the work piece.
#9
Quote by Skeet UK
Your very welcome.

If you have access to a compressor. Get a mini Jet, Gravity feed spray gun, with a 0.8 or 1.2mm tip.

Use it for your colour and clear coats (unless you are using metallic, in which case, get one just for clear coats).

Adjust the nozzle and paint so that you get a good, 4 inch wide patter, with the gun 4 inches from the work piece.



sounds cool dude, i'll try and get hold of one, i'll show you the finished look, when im done