#1
I have a question - If I were to play a fast metal riff just using a couple of power chords (eg E5, F#5 and G5) then what scales/modes could I use to solo over it? Im confused because there's no 3rd in the chord.. thanks.
#2
You could play in E Natural Minor. Seeing as how it contains E, F# and G, a power-chord can function as a minor or major chord, so it doesn't matter if you don't have a 3rd, for example over a chord proggression of E5 - F#5 - A5, you could play in E Minor or E Major, due to power chords functioning as either type of chord.

Pretty sure thats right.
#3
yea.
There are 2 points in playing only powerchords:
1) they sound tough
2) you don't have to worry about major or minor or thinking or whatever
Quote by Retro Rocker


....


haha

*wipes tear from eye*
Oh you're good.
#4
Quote by insanitybreed
I have a question - If I were to play a fast metal riff just using a couple of power chords (eg E5, F#5 and G5) then what scales/modes could I use to solo over it? Im confused because there's no 3rd in the chord.. thanks.


you could use any note at all

use your ear and play as many different things as you can over it... the notes that sound the best? they're the right notes... there are only 12 notes, so it shouldn't take too long to work it out

if this is an Em riff (it probably is with those chords), try notes from E pentatonic minor first of all... they'll probably sound most like what you're looking for... but again: USE YOUR EAR to work out what sounds good to you... it's so simple you don't need theory. If it makes you go 'uggh', it's wrong...

I think people should be encouraged to pick up their guitar and LISTEN to it before asking stuff like this, no offence intended, but you need to trust your instincts and your ear
out of here
Last edited by inflatablefilth at Nov 18, 2008,
#5
I think this progression is I-II-III in E harmonic minor.
This is quite common in metal, although sometimes it's only in harmonic minor over the II chord.

If it was in natural minor, the II chord (F#) would be a 'diminished powerchord' (with a b5)

Edit: I think this is wrong. Harmonic minor does have a b5 chord on the II degree, and an aug. 5 chord on the 3rd. This progression is indeed in E Dorian
A metal band?
Gear:
A Guitar with an LFR > Korg Pitchblack > Behringer EQ > Hardwire CM-2 Overdrive Boss SD-1 > Hardwire CR-7 Chorus>
Orange Tiny Terror >
LzR Engineering 212 cab

My other amp can run Crysis
Last edited by FischmungaXTR at Nov 18, 2008,
#6
Even though the chords don't have 3rds it doesn't mean it's not a major or minor scale. You can play all power chords and it could be in all sorts of keys. It helps to know what intervals belong to each scale. In your case with E as the base you're playing a root (E), major 2nd (F#) and minor 3 (G) so it's likely a dorian mode or aeolian mode (natural minor). We need to drill down further If you write out all the notes (including the fifths) in order you get E F# G, B, C# and D. so the likely missing note is A giving you the dorian mode. It can't be natural minor because that has a b6 (C). So dorian's your scale!
Of course you can always break these rules...