#1
Hey guys,

I was always under the impression that freebird was in the key of g major, but upon investigating the chord progression, there seems to be an F major chord in there that doesn't belong in the key of gmajor. Is this song in a different key than G? Thanks
#2
Quote by rockadoodle
Hey guys,

I was always under the impression that freebird was in the key of g major, but upon investigating the chord progression, there seems to be an F major chord in there that doesn't belong in the key of gmajor. Is this song in a different key than G? Thanks


it's in G... building a major chord on the b7 is very common in blues-derived music
out of here
#3
Quote by inflatablefilth
it's in G... building a major chord on the b7 is very common in blues-derived music


^ +1

Theoretically you could call that a "borrowed" chord. ( from the parallel minor)

* referring to the verse chords ( the solo section at the end is different)
shred is gaudy music
#4
Yeah not every chord in a song has to be diatonic to the key. Look at jazz, almost every chord has a dominant 7 and almost always you have alterations like #9 er b5 or something. It's all wacky.
But still, harmonicly, it will have a tonal center
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#5
Quote by King Of Suede
Yeah not every chord in a song has to be diatonic to the key. Look at jazz, almost every chord has a dominant 7 and almost always you have alterations like #9 er b5 or something. It's all wacky.
But still, harmonicly, it will have a tonal center


Well, those alterations could in many cases be considered sticking strictly to the key. In a major key, the seventh chord is always 'b5,' one of the alterations you cited.
#6
I have a side question that fits with this thread.

what's up with all those songs that have nothing but major chords? like Proud Mary by CCR and all those old classic rock and country type songs.

for instance, Proud Mary contains C major, A major, G major, F major, D major, and B minor (surprise!) what the hell is going on there?
#7
Proud Mary modulates between two keys - the intro/bridge part is in C major, the verses and chorus are in D major.
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#8
hey joe is C Maj, G Maj, D Maj, A maj and E maj. It resolves to E though!!!!
#9
Quote by Tophue
hey joe is C Maj, G Maj, D Maj, A maj and E maj. It resolves to E though!!!!


cycle of 5ths progression mate
#10
Quote by steven seagull
Proud Mary modulates between two keys - the intro/bridge part is in C major, the verses and chorus are in D major.


Why do you say C for the intro/bridge part? Maybe if the A chord was an A minor, but it's not, it's A major.

It's a lot easier to think of the intro/bridge as also being in the key of D. That way you get a bVII - V - IV - bIII progression. bVII and bIII are very common in rock progressions.