#1
Here's my problem: when I put the wire in the record out slot in my amp, the amp gives off a faint buzz, which is amplified in the recordings. This is odd because if you put a wire in the "record out," it is supposed to stop all noise coming from the amp and direct it all to the record out. No guitar sound comes out of the amp, just a faint and persistent humming.

When I go to record, the buzz is loud and persistent in the mix. There's 0 gain here, I'm recording clean. I put a short mp3 in my profile showing the problem. I'm using a solid state amp (Roland Cube 60), but the volume is only about halfway when I was recording. [Edit: Hmm, I think converting to mp3 removed a little bit of the hum, turn the volume up to hear the buzz better]

Funny bit: There's no amp buzz when I unplug the wire from the "record out" The amp is fine without the record out wire in it.

I'm perplexed. Could it be the wire? I'm using a 1/4th inch -> 1/8th inch adapter and then a double sided 1/8th inch wire to go from the amp to computer.

Is there any good way I could filter out the noise (like give REAPER a sample of the background noise, and tell it to filter out all instances of those waveforms or whatever on the track?) I tried the noise reduction gate that comes with REAPER but it didn't do anything.
Last edited by Clownmite at Nov 18, 2008,
#2
maybe the adapter is shoddy ? that's my only guess. i run a 1/4 to 1/8 cable from my roland to my computer and it records flawlessly.
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.
#3
It could be that one of the wire's is picking up interference from a powerlead or some other nearby source, or it could be that one of the adapter's is of not good qauility, hence dirtying the signal.

Try moving the amp as far as possible from any other electrical item's/ power socket's and also try running the cable to the computer/ place wher you are recording with out it going near any power lead's, i.e. running along side them.

Also if you mean you can hear the amp buzz coming out of the amp, im not sure how that would work, becuase it's an out port, not an in port. unless the input on your computer has a slight charge running through it and this is traveling down the cable and being discharged in the amp.

Im not sure that these will help at all, if not, i hope so one can help you out further.
Black Knight CF-60F Semi-Acoustic.

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#4
Sounds like a ground loop. A ground loop is caused by having two items plugged into two different outlets, however they're connected by a common connection, such as an audio cable. By two different outlets, I mean the computer is plugged into one outlet and the amp is plugged into another on a different wall. Try plugging both items into the same outlet and then let me know if the hum is still there. Another option may be to use a DI box.
#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
Sounds like a ground loop. A ground loop is caused by having two items plugged into two different outlets, however they're connected by a common connection, such as an audio cable. By two different outlets, I mean the computer is plugged into one outlet and the amp is plugged into another on a different wall. Try plugging both items into the same outlet and then let me know if the hum is still there. Another option may be to use a DI box.


That was exactly it. Thank you very much.
#7
One other thing you can try that works everytime - If one device is capable of using battery power - do it. This will break the ground loop and eliminate the hum.