#1
i'm having an intonation problem. i'll play a G, sounds fine, i'll play a D, sounds a little off, i'll play a C, sounds perfect, i'll play an E, sounds horrible, its mainly my B string, this is very very frustrating. can you please give me some advise.
#2
Generally speaking, intonation problems that occur with open chords, i.e., chords played at frets 1-3, can be traced to nut position problems or inaccurate fret positioning when the neck was built. Notes that are off higher up the neck will usually be the saddle position.
Check the intonation as follows: tune to standard EADGBe, and try to get each note right on. Then check the strings by fretting at the 12th fret. Be sure to fret normally and get a clean note. The two should match on an electronic tuner.
You can of course use a chromatic tuner to check individual notes on all the strings and frets, but this becomes tedius.
Have you changed strings recently? Old strings can have intonation problems. As can new strings that haven't been wound onto the tuning pegs correctly.
#3
actually, i JUST put new strings on today. .13 ClearTones.

I have a 1975 Epiphone. i've done some work on it myself. I built a bridge and have adjusted the truss rod to lower my action. i'm familair at how to test intonation but not familiar with being able to fix it. This isn't a new problem at that.

in fact.

it seems rather random. some days, it sounds better than others. but more than not, my guitar is acting up. if you could fill me in on a 'proper' stringing technique, or how to adjust what should be adjusted, i would appreciate it.
Last edited by Lukegraube at Nov 18, 2008,
#4
Quote by Lukegraube
actually, i JUST put new strings on today. .13 ClearTones.

I have a 1975 Epiphone. i've done some work on it myself. I built a bridge and have adjusted the truss rod to lower my action. i'm familair at how to test intonation but not familiar with being able to fix it. This isn't a new problem at that.

in fact.

it seems rather random. some days, it sounds better than others. but more than not, my guitar is acting up. if you could fill me in on a 'proper' stringing technique, or how to adjust what should be adjusted, i would appreciate it.


.13s are a bit on the heavy side...you might have placed enough tension on the neck, and enough pull on the bridge and saddle to raise the action, such that fretted notes play sharper than they should and/or to cause the position of the saddle to shift toward the nut. Try stringing with a lighter set...I know, Cleartones are HELLA pricey, but maybe you can talk to the guy who sold you these and didn't say ".13s...are you sure...?"

The whole top/bridge/saddle/neck-relief equation should be in equlibrium and not under too much stress from any unusual source like overly heavy strings.

B strings are always a problem intonation-wise, I don't care who you are, but it seems to me that a '75 Epiphone should probably be strung with no more than .11s...let the top do it's job, let the whole thing relax a bit.
#5
I tend to agree (for what it's worth).....I don't go heavier than .052 on my Low E, and if you are using .013 on your High E then I would imagine that in that particular string set, your Low E would be about a .056 or so, which is way to heavy for the typical accoustic (unless it has an enormously fat neck), that I play.

I had previously found a string chart on the Epiphone site that recommended a maximum .012 - .052 for acoustic (.pdf available upon request to "nutmegger1957@yahoo.com).
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
#6
Quote by Lukegraube
actually, i JUST put new strings on today. .13 ClearTones.

I have a 1975 Epiphone. i've done some work on it myself. I built a bridge and have adjusted the truss rod to lower my action. i'm familair at how to test intonation but not familiar with being able to fix it. This isn't a new problem at that.

in fact.

it seems rather random. some days, it sounds better than others. but more than not, my guitar is acting up. if you could fill me in on a 'proper' stringing technique, or how to adjust what should be adjusted, i would appreciate it.


Well, whenever I restring an acoustic that has the basic setup, meaning standard tuners, no locking nut and so on, I make sure to do a couple of things. First, start by passing the new string through the hole in the tuning post and pull out the far end until the whole string is straight. Then I pull back some slack on it. I'll lift the string up at the 5th fret area while pointing to and touching that spot on the fretboard. Using my hand as a sort of gauge, I'll lift the string away from the fretboard a desired amount. That amount changes from high E to low E as you know. For the high E I'll lift the string to maybe about mid palm. Higher as I move towards the low E(I always restring starting with the high E and work my way to the low). Now that I've got this bit of slack, I'll hold the string in that position in the hole of the tuner and begin winding it up, making sure the wraps are going the right way so that the string comes off the tuning post on the inside edge of it then heads to the nut. Wind up until the pigtail comes around and make sure the first wrap is over the top of the hole, or the side of the hole away from the headstock. Continue to wrap and the next time it comes around, make sure the wrap goes under the hole. Then just keep winding up the remainder of slack in the string. This will give you a lock of sorts. That first wrap is the lock as it pulls down onto the pigtail end, preventing slipping. There should be enough slack overall to create this first wrap, followed by 2-3 more wraps below the hole in the tuning post. For the low E, you'll need the most slack, so I usually pull it up from the 5th fret about the length of my hand. Somewhere in that area. The low E doesn't need 3 wraps below the hole. 1 or 2 will hold it snug as long as you've got that first locking wrap in place.
Sorry if this is so wordy, but it's the best I can do at describing, in text, how to do something like this.
At any rate, the tuning of my guitars is always rock steady and I get absolutely no slippage at the tuning posts. Once the strings settle in, the only real issue with tuning is the changes in weather and how that effect the guitars.
#7
Let me simplify that:

Pull the string through til straight
back off an inch
wind over and under til tight
tune
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT