#1
hey what is the chord progression of the Dm scale? im terrible when it comes to this stuff....
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...sounds like music to me
#2
oh god..

there are many,

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#3
by "chord progression" i think you mean "chords in that key".
but the chords in Dm are:
Dm, Edim, F, Gm, Am, Bb, C, Dm.
(you'll notice that they are the same chords in F major. Thats because Dm is the relative minor of F major)
if you dont understand relative minors, im sorry but im too tired to explain, look it up in a theory thread.
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#4
thanks.................................................. yeah...
Be still my heart, I hear your back cracking...


...sounds like music to me
#5
but that also depends if you wanna use harmonic minor for D, which changes is up a bit.
it would go D minor, Edim, F augmented, G Minor, A Major, Bb major, Cdim

I think, don't quote me on that, cause i'm not quite awake for that
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#6
^You wouldn't typicaly use the harmonic minor scale in that way. You can if you want, but it is typically used just to make the A chord major (and dominant when you attach its 7th).

The chords in the key of Dm are generally considered: Dm, Edim, F, Gm, A, Bb, C. You would use D natural minor over all chords but A. Over A, you would use D harmonic minor.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The chords in the key of Dm are generally considered: Dm, Edim, F, Gm, A, Bb, C#dim. You would use D natural minor over all chords but A. Over A, you would use D harmonic minor.
Use a C#dim instead of a regular C. It has a better movement to Dm. You can use C if you want, but it doesnt establish the tonality as well.

there are many,
Not really. The majority of them are modified V-i movements with different predominants and different inversions added.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Use a C#dim instead of a regular C. It has a better movement to Dm. You can use C if you want, but it doesnt establish the tonality as well.
That would get rid of the classic i VII VI V7 progression. C#dim7 is almost an A7 chord, anyway.
#9
The chords in the key of Dm are generally considered: Dm, Edim, F, Gm, A, Bb, C#dim. You would use D natural minor over all chords but A. Over A, you would use D harmonic minor.


Harmonic minor isn't really treated as a scale that you would modulate to over the V chord. It describes only a harmonic convention within minor tonality.The decision whether to use a major or minor seventh in the melody is determined by more factors than just the presence of the V.
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#10
Quote by jakewynnrocks
hey what is the chord progression of the Dm scale? im terrible when it comes to this stuff....
Do you want to go through how to do this stuff? It's not too hard. I'm sure we can help you out. Just ask


You might like this thread btw: linky linky


Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor isn't really treated as a scale that you would modulate to over the V chord. It describes only a harmonic convention within minor tonality.The decision whether to use a major or minor seventh in the melody is determined by more factors than just the presence of the V.
Would you be able to explain this to me (dumb terms) because I have no clue what the hell that means.
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#11
Would you be able to explain this to me (dumb terms) because I have no clue what the hell that means.


Harmonic minor traditionally isn't used when constructing a melody because the augmented second interval is considered by many to be dissonant. Really, harmonic minor is just the convention of using a V chord in a minor key, it really isn't a "scale" at all (though some circles do treat it as one). In order to eliminate the augmented second, composers would traditionally raise the sixth and seventh when moving upwards towards the tonic, and lower them when moving downwards towards the dominant. This is further compounded by the need to consider whether the underlying harmony is suggesting a major or minor sixth/seventh, so it's really far more complicated than "play harmonic minor over the dominant".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor traditionally isn't used when constructing a melody because the augmented second interval is considered by many to be dissonant. Really, harmonic minor is just the convention of using a V chord in a minor key, it really isn't a "scale" at all (though some circles do treat it as one). In order to eliminate the augmented second, composers would traditionally raise the sixth and seventh when moving upwards towards the tonic, and lower them when moving downwards towards the dominant. This is further compounded by the need to consider whether the underlying harmony is suggesting a major or minor sixth/seventh, so it's really far more complicated than "play harmonic minor over the dominant".
I see. I can't believe I actually understood that too. I should get a good book that cover's this kind of stuff that isn't basic theory that we all know. I should get that book, Harmony by Walter Piston, since it seems to have done you a lot of good.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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#14
^I fucking hate spinal tap just because of that joke. I wish frenchy would somehow wordfilter that joke out of ug.
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor traditionally isn't used when constructing a melody because the augmented second interval is considered by many to be dissonant. Really, harmonic minor is just the convention of using a V chord in a minor key, it really isn't a "scale" at all (though some circles do treat it as one). In order to eliminate the augmented second, composers would traditionally raise the sixth and seventh when moving upwards towards the tonic, and lower them when moving downwards towards the dominant. This is further compounded by the need to consider whether the underlying harmony is suggesting a major or minor sixth/seventh, so it's really far more complicated than "play harmonic minor over the dominant".
When your writing for a singer, this is correct (although it's a little more complicated than that). The human voice is limited, it has trouble with out of key notes and can't (usually) play any augmented interval (tritones, augmented sixth, augmented second).

When you're improvising (BGC was most likely talking about improvising), you can use as many tritones and as many augmented seconds (harmonic and melodic) as you like. Guitars can play anything.
#15
Quote by demonofthenight
(BGC was most likely talking about improvising)
I was, but a good singer should be able to hit awkward intervals. The verse of Pearl Jam's Even Flow has Eddie singing a bunch of tritones.