#1
Okay ya'll, so here's what's up.

Christmas is rolling around, and I think that I want a new guitar. Now, I've been playing for about four years now, and have used the same guitar the entire time. It's an acoustic electric fender DG-22CE. Recently, it's been going out of tune quite frequently, and is in bad need of a tune up. Despite all this, I do like the guitar. The biggest problem that I have with it is that the action is very high, so it's hard to play barre chords on it, and it really hurts my fingers to do so. Sometimes it just makes this terrible noise, because it's too hard to push the strings down all the way. I can do it, but it hurts.

Now, this brings me to my problem. I think that I want a new guitar. If I got one, I think that I'd want just a regular acoustic. I was looking at the Epiphone Hummingbird, the black one. Here is the thing though, it sounds stupid but I really feel almost guilty getting a new guitar. I don't really need one, and I feel like I am betraying my old guitar, in a strange way because it is not a person, I know. Also, if I do get a new guitar, I'd want it to be nice looking, not just sounding. I can't stand a plain looking guitar. Mine right now is this really nice blue color, which fits me perfectly. The guitar fits my personality lookwise, and I am really looking for something interesting that also fits, which is why I looked at the Hummingbird.

So, what do you think? Should I just pay to get the old guitar repaired and find a way to lower the action, however much that may cost, or do I buy a whole new guitar? If I do buy a new one, which should I buy? I'm looking like 400 and under. Still, I'd feel guilty not using this one anymore.

Thoughts?
#2
Pay the money to get yours fixed up and action lowered for you. Or if the acoustic just isn't good sounding or not good quality get a new one. If its good then just fix it up and keep it. That's what I did with my classical, i've had it 9 years.
#6
I would just have both. Partly because I'm a complete guitar *****, but mainly because each guitar has it's own personality and tends to inspire you to play different things. Every time I pick up a guitar with lots of soul, I find myself playing cool things that I'd never played before.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#7
I might have both. I know it'll cost 60 bucks to fix the tuning problem, but how much would it cost to lower the action do you think?

If I get a new one, would you suggest the Seagull D6, Epiphone Hummingbird, Samick Beaumont D7, or something else?
#9
Quote by Skierinanutshel
so, do you find a secret lover and have an affair, or just buy your wife plastic surgery?


SECRET LOVER FTW!


Even better:

Buy your wife plastic surgery then introduce her to your sexy new lover and....

MENAGE A TRIOS FTW! =)
#10
I agree with the above...have both guitars. The Epi Hummingbird has a solid top, should sound pretty nice, and should play very well if it's set up correctly. I've never played the Epi version of the Hummingbird, but if its anything at all like the original, or any number of other copies that have come out over the years it should play very easily (these are known for having narrow necks and nice action).

It sounds like you're outgrowing the Fender, but to try to sell it to offset the cost of a new one...well, lets just say that it might be more worth it to just hang on to it. You could try using it for alternate tunings, which will likely lower the action somewhat, and of course the other thing that alternate tunings and a higher action are good for is SLIDE. I don't know if this kind of playing interests you, but a guitar with a high action could be your ticket to learning all kinds of new stuff. You can afford to do some experimenting with a guitar like this that you might hesitate about if it was your only axe.

While you're enjoying playing your new Epi, check out some recordings by Leo Kottke, Jimmy Page acoustic stuff from LZ III...stuff like that...and get yourself a bottleneck or a 13/16ths deep socket for trying it out on the ol trusty Fender.

mmmmSLIPPERY!
Last edited by maxtheaxe at Nov 18, 2008,
#11
the action problem can be solved simply by adjusting your truss rod. if you know what your doing, or just research it, its not that hard. but, theres nothing against having 2 guitars ;D
#12
Quote by Lukegraube
the action problem can be solved simply by adjusting your truss rod. if you know what your doing, or just research it, its not that hard. but, theres nothing against having 2 guitars ;D



The truss rod is NOT. for adjusting action. Ever. Truss rods are for bowing problems only.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
Quote by Lukegraube
the action problem can be solved simply by adjusting your truss rod. if you know what your doing, or just research it, its not that hard. but, theres nothing against having 2 guitars ;D
WRONG.

Leave the truss rod alone. The truss rod is used to adjust the curvature of the neck. If you don't know what you're doing you could easily cause irreparable damage, and at the least you could end up with messed up intonation and buzzing.

What a repairman/technician needs to determine is whether the action is high at the nut, the saddle, or both. If, for example, action is too high at the nut, you could crank that truss rod all the way back and you'd still have a hard time barring the first fret.

As I understand it, filing your saddle down yourself isn't a big deal - just make sure you do it evenly and don't take too much off unless you happen to have a spare saddle sitting around. Filing down nut slots is a different issue - luthiers use a special set of nut slot files and you wouldn't want to go too deep or to make them uneven in depth so it's best to leave that up to a pro.
#14
Hey, you know...its a FENDER acoustic guitar. However much it was new, the resale value just wouldn't justify the expense of having it's action gone through by a pro. Would cost as much as the guitar is worth, if not more.

Just string it lighter and/or tune it to open G or D or whatever suits...it'll sound better and open up some new vistas...get the Epi, keep the Fender and give it a new purpose...hell, throw some slinkys on there, capo it and turn it into a 6 string tenor! Lots of things you could do with this.
#15
Good advice guys.

Okay, so would you reccommend the Seagull S6 or the Epiphone Hummingbird? I'll be getting either one of those, and keeping the old one.
#16
Try them out. They're very different guitars.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.