#1
Here it says that Note 7 is a Perfect 5th http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music)
Number of semitones
equal-tempered name alternative names
0 Perfect Unison Diminished second
1 Minor second Augmented unison
2 Major second Diminished third
3 Minor third Augmented second
4 Major third Diminished fourth
5 Perfect fourth Augmented third
6 Tritone Augmented fourth
Diminished fifth
7 Perfect fifth Diminished sixth
8 Minor sixth Augmented fifth
9 Major sixth Diminished seventh
10 Minor seventh Augmented sixth
11 Major seventh Diminished octave
12 Perfect octave Augmented seventh

and here it says Note 5 is your Perfect 5th http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

Interval | Name | Note.(In C)
-----------------------------------------------
1 | Unison (root note) | C
b2 | Minor Second | Db
2 | Major Second | D
#2 | Augmented Second | D#
b3 | Minor Third | Eb
3 | Major Third | E
4 | Perfect Fourth | F
#4 | Augmented Fourth | F#
b5 | Diminished Fifth | Gb
5 | Perfect Fifth | G
#5 | Augmented Fifth | G#
b6 | Minor Sixth | Ab
6 | Major Sixth | A
#6 | Augmented Sixth | A#
bb7 | Diminished Seventh | Bbb
b7 | Minor Seventh | Bb
7 | Major Seventh | B
8 | Unison (Octave higher) | C
b9 | Minor Ninth | Db
9 | Major Ninth | D
#9 | Augmented Ninth | D#


Can anyone clear this up for me ???
#2
thats because the first chart is counting half steps, the second is counting intervals.
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#3
Ok to clear it up a little could you possible give me your explanation for what you just said? Something about it is confusing me a little. I understand a Half step is a semi tone away from the previous note and a whole step = 1 tone but I am getting confused when adding the sharps and flats while keeping tones and semitones( steps and half steps) in order.
#4
Whats the difference isnt a half step equal to 1 interval for instance. A -> A# equals 1 interval and B to C is one interval but they are both half steps.
#5
So when dealing with intervals it isnt necessary to apply major/ minor scale? Say I have
G A B C D E F# G which is G major/ Ionian. Ok all note within this scale from 1 - 8octave would be.

| G | G# | A | A# | B | C | C# | D | D# | E | F | F# | G* | "*" key for octave.

Now if I wanted to find my Perfects, Majors, Minors, AUG, DEM, what would I do???

Since I am having trouble I would appreciate if we start with just an explanation to the Perfects and Majors or something.

Any help would be GREAT thx for replies.
#6
Major scale W W H W W W H

unison = 0 intervals so it the 1st interval of the scale
Major 2nd = is 2 half steps(or 1 whole step) so its the 2nd Interval of the scale
Major 3rd = 4 half steps(or 2 whole steps) so its the 3rd
etc..

did that help?
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#7
A little but whe I further investigate Chart 2

1 | Unison (root note) | C
b2 | Minor Second | Db
2 | Major Second | D
#2 | Augmented Second | D#
b3 | Minor Third | Eb
3 | Major Third | E

I dont understand the fact that Db is the only note mention between notes C and D which is a wole step and between whole step D and E you are give D# and Eb with a dif. name which is the same note though.
#8
let me take it a little further If something is flatted it is diminished and if something is sharpened it is augmented so in this case could b2 | Minor Second | Db be referred to as #1 | Augmented First | C#
#9
if i'm not mistaken a maj or perfect raised a half step is aug.
and a minor or perfect lowereds half step is dim
so your asking if there is such this as an augmented unison.. yes,
have i ever seen it.. no lol
(don't quote me on it tho cuz i'm not 100% sure)
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#10
I think the reason that C# (#1) and E# (#3) don't appear on that chart is because they have absolutely no practical use to anyone reading it and whose only purpose would be to further confuse beginners.
#11
Quote by rebel624
Here it says that Note 7 is a Perfect 5th http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music)
Number of semitones
equal-tempered name alternative names
0 Perfect Unison Diminished second
1 Minor second Augmented unison
2 Major second Diminished third
3 Minor third Augmented second
4 Major third Diminished fourth
5 Perfect fourth Augmented third
6 Tritone Augmented fourth
Diminished fifth
7 Perfect fifth Diminished sixth
8 Minor sixth Augmented fifth
9 Major sixth Diminished seventh
10 Minor seventh Augmented sixth
11 Major seventh Diminished octave
12 Perfect octave Augmented seventh

and here it says Note 5 is your Perfect 5th http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

Interval | Name | Note.(In C)
-----------------------------------------------
1 | Unison (root note) | C
b2 | Minor Second | Db
2 | Major Second | D
#2 | Augmented Second | D#
b3 | Minor Third | Eb
3 | Major Third | E
4 | Perfect Fourth | F
#4 | Augmented Fourth | F#
b5 | Diminished Fifth | Gb
5 | Perfect Fifth | G
#5 | Augmented Fifth | G#
b6 | Minor Sixth | Ab
6 | Major Sixth | A
#6 | Augmented Sixth | A#
bb7 | Diminished Seventh | Bbb
b7 | Minor Seventh | Bb
7 | Major Seventh | B
8 | Unison (Octave higher) | C
b9 | Minor Ninth | Db
9 | Major Ninth | D
#9 | Augmented Ninth | D#


Can anyone clear this up for me ???
Dude I'm drunk as and just watched Hancock for the first time. It was ****.

Anyway I didnt' read anything before this post so chances are someone has it already.

There's two ways to measure a tonal distance.

One is in relation to the chromatic scale. If you think of c to the next highest c as 12 equal tones then c to g is 7 steps. C C# D D# E F F# G = 7 steps - actually 8 steps if you're just counting the in betweens..

But if you know the C major scale then you know not all of these notes are part of the C major scale. So in the C major scale you get C D E F G - C to G = 5 steps.

In either case the real distance is the same. C to G. This is called a pefect fifth because of how it relates to the maor scale. Hope this makes ome sense. Chabnces are the people above e made better posts I'm just too drunk to care. HAAHHAHAHHAHHAHA
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Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 19, 2008,
#12
The first example is all the intervals of the chromatic scale - the 12 semitones that make up an octave. The second example is listing all the enharmonics separately but doesn't have as many of the alternate designations, and also it goes past the first octave. If it's re-arranged like this you'll see it's basically exactly the same list....

0 1 Unison (root note) | C
1 b2 Minor Second Db
2 Major Second D
3 #2 Augmented Second D# / b3 Minor Third Eb
4 3 Major Third E
5 4 Perfect Fourth F
6 #4 Augmented Fourth F# / b5 Diminished Fifth Gb
7 5 Perfect Fifth G
8 #5 Augmented Fifth G# / b6 Minor Sixth Ab
9 6 Major Sixth A / bb7 Diminished Seventh Bbb
10 #6 Augmented Sixth A# / b7 Minor Seventh Bb
11 7 Major Seventh B
12 8 | Unison (Octave higher) C
--------------
b9 Minor Ninth Db
9 Major Ninth D
#9 Augmented Ninth D#

The bold numbers simply indicate how many semitones you move along from the root note to get to that interval.

Basically, the major 5th is the 5th note of the major scale, however that note is 7 semitones above the root note.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Nov 19, 2008,
#13
dont ****ing count intervals by semitones. Just learn your major scales and do it from there. Also intervals like A -> A# are actually unisons. Blew your ****ing mind
#14
A to A# isn't a unison, it's a minor second.
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#15
Quote by steven seagull
A to A# isn't a unison, it's a minor second.


augmented unison???
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#16
that too, but it's not a "unison" - referring to something as a unison means that it's the same note, and A and A# are obviously not the same note.
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#17
Its still a unison! On paper it is a unison! music theory has nothing to do with sound!
#18
also no it can't be a minor second. A to Bb would be because B is the second note in the A major (or minor) scale.
#19
Music theory has everything to to with sound on account of it relating to MUSIC.

Bb and A# are enharmonic, they're the same pitch - but yes, strictly speaking you'd never go from A to A# within a diatonic scale structure because you don't use the same note twice. However, if you're wanting to refer to the notes outside the scale you've got to call them something, in that case I suppose Bb and A# are equally valid.
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#20
It's so much easier (at least for me) to quantify intervals by the number of pitch classes that separate two given pitches.