#1
Ok ive just bought a beater off the 'bay, intentions - put it back together and make it work again. Now i'm not totally inexperienced, but i do have a few questions about things ive never done before.

so, first thing - its got crap inlays - like trapezoids, but someone couldn't be arsed making them full squared at the corners, and they are rounded and look rubbish. my plan is to take them out (how?) and then do like a half scallop on the neck (i'e, scallop the front half of the fret, and leave the back half the same) so that no-one can tell its had inlays.

now, my questions are

1. how do i take the inlays out without damaging the neck? i dont care about damaging the inlays.
2. how thick are the inlays? if they are quite thick then this may mean scalloping a lot more than is good for the neck (ie - sand through the side dots and into the actual neck)
3. is there anything that ive not mentioned here that someone thinks is important?

Btw, i have a feeling some people may talk about the value, and how its not going to be worth anything by doing it up - im doing this because i like to see dead guitars brought back to life, and because i enjoy the process almost as much as the end result.
#2
I think you can use a hairdryer to soften the glue holding in the inlays and then pop em out. Then use a wood filler to cover the holes and then scallop. You don't want to scallop too deep either. Also I don't think you should scallop the entire neck, and I'm not really sure what you mean by a half scallop, but I think you mean that the fret will still have wood you can press the string against, which kinda kills the idea of scalloping.
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#3
really rough diagram

ll-----____ll

right, if you imagine the first 2 l's as the nut, the next bit (-----) would be the fretboard in its normal state, it then curves into ____ which is cut lower until the next ll which is the first fret - this is repeated on all the frets till the start getting pretty small.

the idea behind this is that apparently it makes it easier for chording. I saw a guide to it on project guitar and thought it looked cool - and to be fair, its like a haircut - if you leave it too long, you can cut more off, if you take it all off, you got nothing to work with.

thanks for the hairdryer tip - just a question though, will it not crack the wood? its quite an old guitar - i plan on lemon oiling it a few days before to see if i can give it some life back, and time to seep in, but i dont want to f.b to crack
#4
I think you can use a soldering iron to heat them - That might be frets I'm thinking of though.

I think i've seen some folk just dig them out with a dremmel.

I think I know the scallop design you mean - did richie blackmore not have it on his guitar?
#5
The idea of scalloping as I've gathered is the reduce the pressure necessary to make contact between the string and the fretwire, resulting in greater speed for soloing. As far as I know the lower frets don't really need scalloping. Also, with less wood there putting too much pressure can bend the string and make the note sharper. But if you want to scallop the lower frets, work away.

The hairdryer won't crack the wood as far as I know, besides, you need to refill the fretboard after removing the inlays so any cracks can be touched up with the filler later.
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#6
I thought blackmore had it on his but then someone told me that I was wrong and that the blackmore scallop was just deeper at the high e than the low e.

Ravioli, no I dont think the lower frets do need scalloping to be honest. Well, if were being fully honest none of them do - the scallop is just to hide the holes that the inlays will leave (i dont want to put new ones in) and ive always wondered what it was like to play on a scallop fretboard. so i figured i'd give it a go on this. the only real reason im doing them all is for some congruence across the neck.
#7
Blackmore has scalloped frets, but I'm not sure if he has the whole fretboard scalloped.

If your only scalloping to hide the holes from the inlays don't bother. You will need to fill the holes before scalloping anyway. If you are just wondering what its like to play on a scalloped fretboard I'd suggest scalloping the high frets, 15-24 is what people usually scallop to I think. Just follow a guide on scalloping and just do it on a few frets. Good luck with it
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#8
Quote by ravioli123
Blackmore has scalloped frets, but I'm not sure if he has the whole fretboard scalloped.

If your only scalloping to hide the holes from the inlays don't bother. You will need to fill the holes before scalloping anyway. If you are just wondering what its like to play on a scalloped fretboard I'd suggest scalloping the high frets, 15-24 is what people usually scallop to I think. Just follow a guide on scalloping and just do it on a few frets. Good luck with it


No - im not sure if he has the whole f/b scalloped either. ive looked for pictures but there always of other peoples attempts, and there always different. every picture of his guitar is too far away, or a bad angle to get a gud look.
#9
to get markers out, what I do is drill a hole through it with a small drill bit, stop as soon as you see wood, put the tip of a preheated soldering iron in the hole, after a few secinds the glue should melt and getting a piece of stiff wire, put that into the hole and wiggle the marker loose