#1
Hey guys, I searched for this and couldn't find anything, so sorry if this has been asked already.

I just got a Squire Fretless Jazz Bass (the Jaco Pastorius model), and I am curious as to what type of strings will be best for it. It came with the stock roundwounds on it, but I was recommended flatwounds by someone who owns the same bass. Which would you guys recommend? Also if you have any other suggestions so that I can get the most out of this bass, I would really appreciate it.
#2
On a Jazz, I like the sound of rounds better, personally. There's really no point to using flats on a bass with a plastic fingerboard.
Nope, no sig here.
#3
I really love the smooth feel of flats on a fretless. DiAddario Chromes are a nice choice. I liked the Ernie Ball flats as well. I've never tried them on a jazz bass though, only P-Basses.
Line 6 SpiderValve 112 - Strymon SV Pre; G12-K100
Ibanez RG Custom Built - Seymour Duncan JB/Jazz
Line 6 M13
#4
My Yamaha is currently in the shop having it's fingerboard epoxied so i can put rounds on without damaging the fingerboard. I shall tell of it's goodness once i have it back
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#5
Quote by Double Basser
My Yamaha is currently in the shop having it's fingerboard epoxied so i can put rounds on without damaging the fingerboard. I shall tell of it's goodness once i have it back

i took my starter bass and defretted it and epoxied it all by myself. you should have done it. its good to know how to do that kind of stuff, saves some money and you get some self satisfaction out of knowing that you did it your self.

TS you can try out flats to see if you like them. otherwise i believe you can just keep on using the round wounds if you like the sound of them better.
#6
It really depends on the tone you are looking for. Flats are going to mellow out the "mwah" impact of a fretless. I've had both rounds and flats on my fretless--with rounds it has a bit more of a singing quality, a bit more bite.

For most fretless basses, you have to epoxy the fretboard otherwise rounds will eat into the fretboard overtime.
#7
haha, I played a fretless in a shop today - I found it really annoying cos every time I didn't look at the fretboard I'd drift out of tune.

aye, I've also heard that roundwounds chew up the wood.
#8
Quote by fudger
i took my starter bass and defretted it and epoxied it all by myself. you should have done it. its good to know how to do that kind of stuff, saves some money and you get some self satisfaction out of knowing that you did it your self.

TS you can try out flats to see if you like them. otherwise i believe you can just keep on using the round wounds if you like the sound of them better.

yeah i would do it myself but my uncle handmakes surfboards for a living and offered to do it for free bar the cost of the resin.

I trust him more then i trust me
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects
#9
O.K. someone correct me but I was under the impression that a fretless HAD to have flatwounds or else roundwound strings would eat through the epoxycoat/wood?
#10
Quote by Pizza The Hut
O.K. someone correct me but I was under the impression that a fretless HAD to have flatwounds or else roundwound strings would eat through the epoxycoat/wood?


Not true. This is why people put poly / epoxy on their fretless fretboards to protect them from the grind of rounds.
#11
Quote by jimRH7
haha, I played a fretless in a shop today - I found it really annoying cos every time I didn't look at the fretboard I'd drift out of tune.

aye, I've also heard that roundwounds chew up the wood.

some woods are unchewable. ebony comes to mind.

plastic also, will not be hurt by the strings.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#12
Personally I would stick with the rounds on the Squire Jaco replica. Having played your bass in a music store not to long ago you wouldn't keep that same growl with the flats as you would with the round and fretless bass with that jazz bass growl is a sound to die for IMHO
Co-Founder of The Geddy Lee Fanclub
PM me or timmEH to join

#1 Rush / Yes fan of The Bass Militia
PM Dinky to join

Founder of The Ernie Ball MusicMan owners club and proud owner of a Black Sapphire Bongo 4 HHp
PM me to join
#13
I like Dean Markley Blue Steel strings. They're used by Les Claypool of Primus.
#14
Quote by anarkee
Not true. This is why people put poly / epoxy on their fretless fretboards to protect them from the grind of rounds.


Actually, it still chews through the epoxy. Same for harder woods like ebony. It just takes longer. The epoxy is easy to sand flat and add a new coat though, so that is no problem.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#15
Apologies if this seems like I'm hi-jacking the thread,
Just wondering, can the V.M. jazz get a good "mwah" sound with some flats on? I know it's been mentioned, but I just love that sound and i haven't heard a single bad thing about the bass =]
-Gear-
Ibanez SR-500
Epiphone EJ-200
PRS SE EG (SSH version)
Ashdown Perfect Ten 30w
Ashdown ABM500 Evo II

Based in Birmingham, available for any bass work.
MSN or email narcolepsy_patrol@hotmail.co.uk
#16
on the topic of fretless basses, would i be able to use a fretless in metal??
Twitter: ScottWotton
Tumblr: ScottWotton
YouTube: ScottWotton

3DS FC: 5043-1553-4655
Friend Safari: Rock type with Boldore, Pupitar and Barbaracle.

Wants his username as ScottWotton. >.>
#17
Quote by Vampire 255
on the topic of fretless basses, would i be able to use a fretless in metal??


Listen to Death, Sadus and Cynic.

Steve DiGiorgio & Sean Malone both do.
Quote by ChemicalFire
The point of underground bands is their not popular or famous most of the time. Thus there is a good chance they suck.
#18
Quote by Vampire 255
on the topic of fretless basses, would i be able to use a fretless in metal??


Why not? Steve Digiorgio does.
Quote by skater dan0
Damn you and your ninja-like modding
#19
^
thanks

ill try some out next time i go into town
Twitter: ScottWotton
Tumblr: ScottWotton
YouTube: ScottWotton

3DS FC: 5043-1553-4655
Friend Safari: Rock type with Boldore, Pupitar and Barbaracle.

Wants his username as ScottWotton. >.>
#20
Quote by gm jack
Actually, it still chews through the epoxy. Same for harder woods like ebony. It just takes longer. The epoxy is easy to sand flat and add a new coat though, so that is no problem.


Yes, I know...but the point is it doesn't chew through the wood fretboard and it is easily resolved by another coat or two of epoxy or poly.

Fretless basses still have a really nice mwah with flats--it just has a bit less bite.
#21
Thanks guys. I'll probably stick with the rounds and at some point get the coating on the wood. I might try some flats anyways though, just to see how I like the tone and feel and such myself. How much does it usually cost to get the epoxy put on?
#22
Does it void the warranty to epoxy it?
Quote by cakeandpiemofo
Of course I don't wanna go in the woods. There's bears in there.


Quote by Deliriumbassist
Jeff Ament is a sexy sexy beast.



Quote by Karvid
Yes. Chest hair = automatic awesome. Even if you're a woman.
#24
The whole point of that Squier model is to use roundwounds on a fretless. That's why it has an ebonol fingerboard. To use rounds.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#25
Quote by anarkee
Yes, I know...but the point is it doesn't chew through the wood fretboard and it is easily resolved by another coat or two of epoxy or poly.

Fretless basses still have a really nice mwah with flats--it just has a bit less bite.



"I never practised all that much on a fretless because the strings would always eat the neck up"

---Jaco Pastorius, Modern Electric Bass