#1
Can anyone direct me to a source that will show me all of the different chords in the minor and major keys? I know the basic chords and understand how they are constructed. I could spend some time finding out what other complex chords fit in each key but it would take a while. I'm looking for something to use as reference. I want something that shows all the chords that are in each key like all the sus chords add chords etc.

Thanks
#4
yea, any chord that only contains notes that are in that key will fit, so there are a ton of possible chords, even if some of em wouldn't makes sense. Like Asus2add4add6. just learn how to construct chords.
#5
Quote by The4thHorsemen
yea, any chord that only contains notes that are in that key will fit, so there are a ton of possible chords, even if some of em wouldn't makes sense. Like Asus2add4add6. just learn how to construct chords.

Asus2add4add6?? lol. I get what you're saying but that would just be A B D E F# = Bm11/A

TS, chord construction from major scale...

C  D  E  F  G  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  A  B  C
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10 11 12 13 14


You will see by looking at the above that every pitch class in the C major scale can be represented by an odd number 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 if we go up into the second octave. The 9 and 11 are usually represented by 2 and 4 when there is no third present. The 6 is used when there is no seventh present. So for example if the chord has the following pitch classes C E G A the A is an added 6th (C6). If the same chord had a B present (C E G A B) then the A would be a 13th extension to the maj7 and the chord would be a Cmaj13.

Any C chord that strictly stays in key will only use the notes of the C major scale so you get...
C (1 3 5)
Csus2 (1 2 5)
Csus4 (1 4 5)
C6 (1 3 5 6)
C6/9 (1 3 5 6 9)
Cmaj7 (1 3 5 7)
Cmaj9 (1 3 5 7 9)
Cadd9 (1 3 5 9)
Cmaj11 (1 3 5 7 9 11)
Cadd11 (1 3 5 11)
Cmaj13 (1 3 5 7 9 11 13)
Cadd13 (1 3 5 13)

And some variation of those. Cmaj7sus2 for example would be 1 2 5 7 a Cmaj13sus would be a Cmaj13 without the third. (sus on it's own usually means sus4. However if you're playing the extended chord with both the 9 and 11 voiced then it is irrelevant.

Now if we did the same thing with the second degree of the C major scale (D) we would end up with different chords because we would want to stay in the key of C Major and would only use notes from the C major scale. However the numbers always refer to the major scale of the root of the chord. Hence when writing out the D chords for the C major scale we only use the notes from C Major but spell them with reference to the D major scale.

So using D F A from C major scale would give us a Dm chord and we would spell this in relation to the D Major 1 b3 5.
Other D root chords would be
Dsus2 (1 2 5) (D E A)
Dsus4 (1 4 5) (D G A)
Dm6 (1 b3 5 6) (D F A B)
Dm6/9 (1 b3 5 6 9) (D F A B E)
Dm7 (1 b3 5 b7) (D F A C)
Dm9 (1 b3 5 b7 9) (D F A C E)
etc etc.

Once you know how chords are constructed it becomes pretty easy to find chords that are "in key" you also have an easier time naming chords.

Good Luck.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 20, 2008,