#2
I dont see why you cant, it would really be up to you. The one guy from hell yeah, dont recall the name, uses a semi hollow washburn which has the basic es-335 shape.
#6
I think one of the guitarists from Down used a semi-hollow when I saw them, but I was pretty far away so I couldn't tell fo sho.
Saint Louis Blues
#8
with a rig set up for an extreme metal tone the only thing in the guitar that really matters is the pickups and even that can be easily compensated for with the judicious use of FX and an EQ. i use a semi hollow and the only real difference with metal dialed into the amp and FX is extra feedback sensitivity which has to be accounted for in high volume situations but isnt necessarily a bad thing all the time and doesnt effect the brutality of the tone.
#10
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
with a rig set up for an extreme metal tone the only thing in the guitar that really matters is the pickups and even that can be easily compensated for with the judicious use of FX and an EQ. i use a semi hollow and the only real difference with metal dialed into the amp and FX is extra feedback sensitivity which has to be accounted for in high volume situations but isnt necessarily a bad thing all the time and doesnt effect the brutality of the tone.


This.

I have played metal stuff on an ESS-335 and it sounds sick...like MichaelOfCanton said, you'll get some nasty feedback at high volumes if you don't make some sort of concession to stifle it..
#11
Well, I think they're made for lovely jazzy cleans, britpop and blues, but that's just me :p
The point is, you can make a stock ES-335 sound metal, but it will never sound or play as metal as an RG. And they're not exactly good looking from a metal perspective - not enough horns or whatever. But if you only dabble in it, then yeah. ES-335 will be fine. Just don't expect the pickups to be screamers (unless you have, dare I say it, the Tom DeLonge model) nor the neck to be shred-friendly.
#12
it depends on how you like your metal. If you like it to be so thick that you can't even tell when you change chords, then a semi-hollow with high gain will suit you nicely. If you like your distortion to be heavy but still clear enough to distinguish individual notes/chords, then a semi hollow may not do it for you unless you back off on the gain a bit. The resonance of a semi hollow is like having a little reverb present, which helps sweeten up a clean tone, but with a ton of gain, it may just make it undefined.

But, thanks to the semi hollow's thicker tone, you can probably find a setting that actually uses less gain than you're used to, but is still "heavy" sounding thanks to the extra resonance.