#2
usually in 3rds or 5ths.
Equipment:
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- Homemade Acoustic
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Pedals: CryBaby - MT-2 - DigiDelay
#5
You can harmonise with a few intervals, 3rds would be the most common, 6ths can be used as well. 5ths and 4ths can sound good but it can sound bad when its a diminished 5th or an augmented 4th

Oh yeah and they dont have to be going the same direction. Two guitars could be going in contramotion, with one going down a scale and another going up or something.
#8
There was a question like this the other day, and I thought it couldn't get any worse.

Noob question in return (it's rhetorical, don't answer this)

How do I play Guitar?

Not to diss you TS, but you should just experiment and see what sounds best. What particular harmonizing sound do u like. Name artists who do harmonized guitar parts which appeal to your ear. Then we can really help you.

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#9
Quote by 13secondslater
Noob question but how do i harmonize for two guitars?


the usual way in rock is to follow the shape of the main line, displaced a 3rd, 5th or octave

when writing vocal harmonies, often the harmony lines outline the harmonic movement rather than double a melody... in other words, the backing singers show chord movement... so you could mix the two and come up with something that harmonizes with the main guitar what uses a mixture of chord tones AND the 'harmonised 3rds' approach... that way you'd get something a bit more organic and less obvious

you could use the above approach to weave a line around the main line... or make one that descends or rises dramatically through it

I disagree with the poster above me that it's not a question worth asking. 'Do what sounds best' isn't much better as an answer
out of here
Last edited by inflatablefilth at Nov 20, 2008,
#10
play the harmonising guitar 3 or 4 frets higher, depending on how good it sounds. use your ears to help.
#12
Lol you people do realize that it's just a matter of time before every interval is named, and Ts is back to start.

And to the guy 2 posts up. The question is worth asking, but what he asks is not. If we don't know what sound he's after, how can we help him?

TS
Give us examples of harmonies that appeal to you ear. (songs or musical passage)

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#13
Quote by inflatablefilth
the usual way in rock is to follow the shape of the main line, displaced a 3rd, 5th or octave

when writing vocal harmonies, often the harmony lines outline the harmonic movement rather than double a melody... in other words, the backing singers show chord movement... so you could mix the two and come up with something that harmonizes with the main guitar what uses a mixture of chord tones AND the 'harmonised 3rds' approach... that way you'd get something a bit more organic and less obvious

you could use the above approach to weave a line around the main line... or make one that descends or rises dramatically through it

+1 good stuff.
Si
#15
6ths sound kwl becuase they're just backwards 3rds (to some that's obvious - to others it ain't)
#16
Quote by madnessJack
6ths sound kwl becuase they're just backwards 3rds (to some that's obvious - to others it ain't)

No, 3rds sound kwl because they're backwards 6ths.

See what I did there? You're point isn't exactly valid.

And it wouldn't be a "backwards" 3rd, it would be the inverse of a 3rd. Major 3rd > Minor 6th / Minor 3rd > Major 6th
#17
Yeah alrite - I'm basing it on triads and you dont get many 6ths in a primary inversion chord now do ya