#1
Does anyone else have a problem with their singing where their S's and occasionaly T's are extremely sharp - almost a pitched whistle? I raised this once before in the comments on a song I posted and one person suggested using a mic with a "pop shield" - has anyone heard of this and is it useful?

Are there recording techniques I could use to fix it? I use reaper and I do notice in the wave profile (or whatever you call it) for the song these whistles appear as very high peaks (usually right to the top of the screen). Is there a way to normalize that somehow to cut down the whistling?

Or is it just something I have to learn not to do when singing? Or just write songs that don't have sharp S's in the lyrics :p

I currently use an old but reliable computer headset mic. I have an M-audio fast track USB device that allows for use of XLR mic so I could buy one (although I believe it would have to be dynamic? When I got it the guy told me it doesn't have phantom power so I can't use a condenser - although it didnt sound like i would want a condensor anyways as it would pick up more of the ambient noise in the room!)

Tips appreciated, I'm a bad enough singer as it is without making people cringe whenever there's an S in one of my songs
My Gear
Epi Les Paul
Roland Microcube
Boss DS-1 pedal
Shure SM57
M-Audio Fasttrack
#2
use a pop shield dude, it will stop the "P" sounds when air from your breath hits the diphragm of the mic

as for the s and t noises, use a de-esser plugin on your software (if you use it)
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#3
This is a pop shield:


They are specifically designed to get rid of the hisses. You should get one.

Cheers
#4
we use those mics at college
Quote by closertofreewil
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PSN ID: blakerz92
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#5
Was just reading about pop shields and they seem to say its for "plosives" i.e. words that start with B or P... while that might help too the real problem I have is with the sharpness on S's (almost a whistle).

Will check and see if reaper comes with a De-esser built in or if I have to download it somewhere.
My Gear
Epi Les Paul
Roland Microcube
Boss DS-1 pedal
Shure SM57
M-Audio Fasttrack
#6
For the other problem, sibilance, look here for prevention. Prevention is much much better than using plugins to correct as something may not go right.

If it really gets bad, you could try Spitfish, which is free.
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Recording Guitar Amps 101
#8
Quote by Fast_Fingers
For the other problem, sibilance, look here for prevention. Prevention is much much better than using plugins to correct as something may not go right.

If it really gets bad, you could try Spitfish, which is free.


Useful link thanks! Will try the de-esser first since that's free; a pop filter will require a non-headset mic, which im thinking of getting anyways. If/when I do get an xlr mic ill def get a pop filter, sounds like they are cheap and effective for improving quality!
My Gear
Epi Les Paul
Roland Microcube
Boss DS-1 pedal
Shure SM57
M-Audio Fasttrack
#9
Ssssss = sibilance.
P - B = plosives.

There are a few ways of avoiding having these artifacts recorded.

1. A lot of trained singers can sing and not have problems with these. I rarely record with a pop filter.

2. Don't let them enter the mic. There's your pop filter. Also, try taking a pencil and taping it (or using a rubber band) vertically across the middle of the pop filter. It helps diffuse the Ssss sounds before they 'hit' the pop filter.

3. The mic - some mics are just more prone to these things than others. Not so much plosives, because all mics are sensitive to that, but some are more forgiving than others when it comes to sibiliance.

As a last resort, you'll need to resort to De-essing, EQ, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Everything everyone has said about the pop shield , and avoiding the sounds in the first place with the way you sing is valid. But I think the real problem is your headset mic.

Cheap computer microphones are not made for recording music, and you'll probably notice the 'whistling' sound you describe will disappear if you use a decent quality dynamic like a Shure SM57.
There is poetry in despair.
#11
Agreed. That's what I was suggesting in #3.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Indeed you did. I've never heard of the pencil/ rubber band trick though. How effective is that? And how does it work?
There is poetry in despair.
#13
It seems reasonably effective. I haven't done any proper tests, but I do give it a shot when sibilance seems to be a problem and it does help. Not sure how it works, exactly.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.