#1
Okay, so I play rhythm, have absolutly no intrest in becoming a lead player, but have started doing scales just for ****s and giggles. Is there any real use for this as a rhythm player? or is there some other skill I should be working on?
We've dressed up in our best...

...and are prepared to go down like gentlemen.

Quote by bogg808
The PBT is for those too TGP for the rest of UG.

#4
so you can converse intelligently with guitar players who have an inkling what they're talking about.
Gear:
PRS SE Singlecut, blue with stoptail (my baby)
Line 6 Spider III 75 (shut up)
Epiphone Les Paul standard
Cheapo Yamaha nylon string
even more cheapo Fender steel string acoustic
#5
Quote by mcraddict81592
Okay, so I play rhythm, have absolutly no intrest in becoming a lead player, but have started doing scales just for ****s and giggles. Is there any real use for this as a rhythm player? or is there some other skill I should be working on?


of course you need scales as a rhythm player, if your lead guitarist is playin in that scale, you can work out which one it is and know what chord progression to play
Quote by Tatersalad1080
do what jimbleton said


^ i did something good!!

Quote by tjhome28
This.


^ to something i said!

☭UG Socialist Party ☭
#6
helps the lead player make solos easier. i just usually have one or two riffs in a song that is from a scale and my friend'll play the lead over those.
Gear
Ibanez RG2EX2
Epiphone Les Paul
Fender Strat
Homemade EVH
Marshall JCM 800 Combo

Quote by freshtunes
its not so much that i feel guilty about masturbating, its the things that i masturbate to that make me feel guilty.
#7
Quote by Jimbleton
of course you need scales as a rhythm player, if your lead guitarist is playin in that scale, you can work out which one it is and know what chord progression to play


This, and counter-melodies/harmonies, key changes, etc.

Know your scales.

ps. Thanks for reminding me that I need to work on that. I'm in the same boat as you; being a rhythm player, etc.
Good Deals: imgooley, pak1351
#8
Scales are the foundation points of chord progressions. After u learn ur scales all over the fretboard, u should be able to write at least triad chord progressions that fit directly with the scale that the lead is going to play. In other words, ur rhythm parts will begin to have much more harmonious points between the chords that u play.

Example: For the A harmonic minor scale, u can play a chord progression which would be:

(this is typical A.harm.min, other chords may fit)

Amin, Bdim, Caug, Dmin, Emaj, Fmaj, G#dim, then back to Amin.
#9
I think everyone should know scales. It's not like ALL that rhythym guitarists play are power chord progressions. The pooey ones, yes, but a good rhytmist should know at least a few simple scales.