#1
could someone tell me the steps in the minor and/or minor harmonic scale?
i cant wright many songs in minor cus i dont know the steps :P
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#2
Natural Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Harmonic minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7
Melodic minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7

You can figure out the steps from that, and you should do that as an exercise, an opportunity to learn.
#7
Quote by anonymous564
i dont know what that means...


Quick explanation!

1 is the first note in the scale ie your root. The rest of the numbers you see are the following 7 notes in the scale you desire, some are flattened (b)
#8
Quote by Ganshar
Use the edit button.
#9
but than if for the natural minor scale, if its 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

if i were in G wouldnt that make g a a# c d e# f?
thats 2 half steps in a row it doesnt sound right...
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#10
That A# has to be called Bb, but how did you come up with E#? It should be Eb, giving you G A Bb C D Eb F for G natural minor.

E# is enharmonic to F; that is, it has the same pitch, but that sound goes by F or E# depending on the context which I'll get to later.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That A# has to be called Bb, but how did you come up with E#? It should be Eb, giving you G A Bb C D Eb F for G natural minor.

E# is enharmonic to F; that is, it has the same pitch, but that sound goes by F or E# depending on the context which I'll get to later.

E#!? Why confuse him, he will never come across an E#
#12
Quote by guitarnoize
E#!? Why confuse him, he will never come across an E#


Ridiculous. E# is as common as any other note.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
Ridiculous. E# is as common as any other note.
Not really, you only see an E# in F# major and C# major and G# major and D# major (the last two keys you'll only see if a song is modulating, as in changing, to these keys). Seeing as C, D, G, A, F, Bb, Eb and Ab are the most common keys and none of these keys contain E#, E# is a relatively rare note. It still exists though.

Sorry if I confused anyone.

Anyway, T/S, in the column section of this website there is a free list of theory articles called "the crusades." Read them.
#14
Quote by demonofthenight
Not really, you only see an E# in F# major and C# major and G# major and D# major


Or any conceivable number of chromatic alterations to the diatonic scale, various harmonic and melodic minor scales, chromatic runs in general...pretty much any time you raise an E by a half step.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
There's a lesson on Musictheory.net which explains also the practical use of this.
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