#1
ok, I was bored (as usual) and an idea hit me... what would a chord with both a major and minor 3rd sound like? so I spent a minute figuring out how the hell to finger this and I found a few.

|-0--0-------
|-6--4--0--0-
|-6--5--5--3-
|-------6--5-
|------------
|------------


and then I added some more chord to em (joke, haha, funny, no need to call out on incorrect terminology)

|-0--0-------
|-6--4--0--0-
|-6--5--5--3-
|-6--5--6--5-
|-4--3--6--5-
|-------4--3-



So I think it's pretty cool, in a very dissonant way. but now, what do i call it?
#2
The first chord in the 2nd diagram has the major note lower in the range. So that will be the establishment. The other note is an extension on top, so you can call it a C#add9+ (+ is augmented which means raised and diminised means lowered) Cause a minor 3rd is a half step higher then a Major 2nd.

If it was a lowered 2nd instead of ur raised 1, it would be a C#add9-. (or a delta or a little o, there are different symbols for the same thing) ( C sharp diminished ninth, or C# with a lowered ninth, flat nine etc.

Ur chord is called: C sharp augmented ninth, or c sharp with a raised ninth.

EDIT: I think it's only augmented if they are both in the same register, but i'm not to sure about this.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 21, 2008,
#3
"Paradise Chords"


anyone get this? at all?
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Awesome
#4
The most famous example of this idea is the "Hendrix Chord" (7#9, I belive, but correct me if I'm wrong). It works really well because of the major/minor ambiguity of the blues.
#5
I'd just go ahead and call them _add#9 chords. Just remember that if you encounter a major 3rd and minor 3rd in the same chord, the major 3rd always takes precedence in the way we give the chord a name, ergo the minor 3rd is always referred to as an augmented 2nd (9th), #9.

Quote by xxdarrenxx
The first chord in the 2nd diagram has the major note lower in the range. So that will be the establishment. The other note is an extension on top, so you can call it a C#add9+ (+ is augmented which means raised and diminised means lowered) Cause a minor 3rd is a half step higher then a Major 2nd.

If it was a lowered 2nd instead of ur raised 1, it would be a C#add9-. (or a delta or a little o, there are different symbols for the same thing) ( C sharp diminished ninth, or C# with a lowered ninth, flat nine etc.

Ur chord is called: C sharp augmented ninth, or c sharp with a raised ninth.

EDIT: I think it's only augmented if they are both in the same register, but i'm not to sure about this.


The symbols Δ and ø (which is what I assume you mean by 'little o') do not refer to the same quality of chord. Moreover they have nothing to do with _addb9 chords.

And the interval you're referring to as a diminished 9th, i.e. b9 is not a diminished interval. It is a minor second (minor 9th) and the name 'C sharp diminished ninth' implies a completely different chord to the one you're describing. C# diminished 9th would include the intervals 1 - b3 - b5 - bb7 - 9 (A diminished 7th chord with a major ninth).
#6
Quote by Johnljones7443
I'd just go ahead and call them _add#9 chords. Just remember that if you encounter a major 3rd and minor 3rd in the same chord, the major 3rd always takes precedence in the way we give the chord a name, ergo the minor 3rd is always referred to as an augmented 2nd (9th), #9.


The symbols Δ and ø (which is what I assume you mean by 'little o') do not refer to the same quality of chord. Moreover they have nothing to do with _addb9 chords.

And the interval you're referring to as a diminished 9th, i.e. b9 is not a diminished interval. It is a minor second (minor 9th) and the name 'C sharp diminished ninth' implies a completely different chord to the one you're describing. C# diminished 9th would include the intervals 1 - b3 - b5 - bb7 - 9 (A diminished 7th chord with a major ninth).


Ah ur right, I knew I did something wrong.

Ts listen to this guy, he has it right.

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#7
ah, thanks John, and everybody else. I guess because of the way I though of it when I had the idea, i didn't think of it as an add#9 when naming it