#1
I know two basic chord progessions, I IV V and ii V I. What are some other common chord progressions?

I have been experimenting with making my own chord progessions, but they usually sound boring. I usually experiment with moving between tonic, subdominant and dominant chord families. What are some things that i should try to experiment with?

thanks
#2
use M7, m7, addX, and sus chords
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#3
The most overused of course: I V vi iii IV I IV V (I believe that's correct, I just figured it out in my head now so correct me if I'm mistaken)
I personally can't stand it outside of Pachebelle's Canon. Remember that it isn't necessarily the progression that is boring but rather the way you are playing it. There are countless ways to voice and arpeggiate the chords.
#4
My personal favorite for light, not mind-wrecking-think-about-every-chord one is:

i iv VI V7

It has all of the "important" scale degrees, and it just sounds nice.
Try doing something with odd chord movements. Look up "Neopolitan Chords", they can spice up a boring progression.
#5
IV iv I is a cool sounding progression the maj then min third in the IV creates a nice resolution to the I chord.

Climbing the diatonic scale with the root works well too
I ii iii IV for example

The ii V I is a cycle of fifths progression. You can extend it further in front or jump on and off the cycle at any time, here is the full one.

I IV viidim iii vi ii V I

You can also replace any of the minor chords here with a major quality (secondary dominants) or make them dom7 chords.

Learn about chord families and diatonic substitution.
I can be subbed with iii and vi (Tonic Family I iii vi)
IV can be subbed with ii (Sub Dominant Family IV ii)
V can be subbed with viidim (Dominant Family V viidim)

So your I IV V can look like I iii IV V where the iii is an extension of the I chord.

You can borrow chords too. If you don't want to use viidim you can just use vii or even VII if you want as a one off in a chord progression if it works.

Good Luck.

EDIT: Each of these ideas might be used in different songs to create interest. They can be mixed and matched or used on their own. They are just some ideas to work with and to help you create your own interesting chord progressions.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 23, 2008,
#6
If I play iii ii vii for example, would it still be considered a I IV V progression?

Also, I want to be able to hear a song, and recognize the chord progression. How do i train my ears to be able to do this?
#7
Another good one that I've just thought of: i IV III IV

Quote by greekorican5
If I play iii ii vii for example, would it still be considered a I IV V progression?

Also, I want to be able to hear a song, and recognize the chord progression. How do i train my ears to be able to do this?


Learn to sing the major/minor scale and the chords derived from them. For example:

Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Ti Do Ti La Sol Fa Mi Re Do

Then sing the scale in thirds:

Do-Mi Re-Fa Mi-Sol Fa-La Sol-Ti La-Do Ti-Re Do

When you are able to easily do this, go ahead and start practicing singing a I IV I V progression. However, to make the process a bit easier, you should begin by singing the IV chord in 2nd in version and the V chord in 1st inversion. This way you don't stray far from the tonic:

I - Do Mi Sol
IV - Do Fa La
I - Do Mi Sol
V - Ti Re Sol

I know that I'm probably not explaining this very well or too vaguely. Try searching google for lessons on this. Hope it helps...
Last edited by Paquijón at Nov 22, 2008,
#8
Just to give a random suggestion.

Check out some songs from the beatles; they have so many interesting modulation and borrowed chords u can learn from. Even if u don't like em, or play a totally different style of music. Their's still some pretty interesting harmonies there.

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#9
Quote by greekorican5
If I play iii ii vii for example, would it still be considered a I IV V progression?

Also, I want to be able to hear a song, and recognize the chord progression. How do i train my ears to be able to do this?

Question 1: On it's own - no. The tonic has to appear somewhere in order to complete the resolution.

Question 2: Practice listening and working out chords. Play chord progressions often and listen to their various sounds.
Si