#1
Hey Guys,
I'm trying to learn some Italian tunes.The only thing is that instead of the usual:C,F,G the chords read do,rei,me.Any links to a site that can help me figure this out?Thanks.
#2
It sounds like solfège or the italian equivalent - I believe it equates to
C Do
D Re
E Mi
F Fa
G Sol
A La

Though I'm not certain
#3
C Do
D Re
E Mi
F Fa
G Sol
A La
B Si

I know how it is in Spanish, not too sure about in Italian, however, I'll give you an example:

La menor = A minor
Fa mayor = F major
Re sostenido mayor (?) = Db major
Sol bemol menor = Gb minor
etc.

They use a system called "fixed do", that is to say, that rather than changing the note that Do represents based on the key, Do will always be C, Re will always be D, etc.
#4
Doh = First degree of a scale
Re = second degree of a scale
Mi = third degree of a scale
Fah = fourth degree of a scale
Sol = fifth degree of a scale
La = sixth degree of a scale
Ti = seventh degree of a scale
Doh = First degree of a scale

Solfege is used to refer to scale degrees, not scale notes. Guys use solfege for learning major scale theory (as it's more formal than calling each degree first second and third) and for sight singing.

There is fixed solfege, but chances are you won't need it unless you're trying to sight sing chromatic work (so unless your some wicked aria or jazz singer, as atonal work is damn hard to sing)
#5
I prefer fixed-do solfege and it is used in most of the non-english world. Once you get used to it you'll find it's easier to sing, say and manipulate.
#6
Got it!I'm hooked now.Any good websites for Italian music.Specifically the music of Naples?
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
Doh = First degree of a scale
Re = second degree of a scale
Mi = third degree of a scale
Fah = fourth degree of a scale
Sol = fifth degree of a scale
La = sixth degree of a scale
Ti = seventh degree of a scale
Doh = First degree of a scale

Solfege is used to refer to scale degrees, not scale notes. Guys use solfege for learning major scale theory (as it's more formal than calling each degree first second and third) and for sight singing.

There is fixed solfege, but chances are you won't need it unless you're trying to sight sing chromatic work (so unless your some wicked aria or jazz singer, as atonal work is damn hard to sing)

Where exactly are you located? As far as I know, in Europe, Do is always C.
#8
Quote by CanCan
Where exactly are you located? As far as I know, in Europe, Do is always C.

Movable solfa is used in Europe too, though not in the same way as fixed do is and I'm not sure how much it is used in mainland Europe.

I live in the UK and I learned normal notes and learned movable solfa as a way to remember the formation of scales (it's not limited to just the major scale) and a way to sight sing (basically it was a way of remembering the sound of intervals).
#9
the movalbe "Do" is mostly used in the states.. well thats what i've been told.. I'm sure other places use it as well..

the reason being is that music isn't strong in early education so its easiest to use it as a scales and intervals rather then set pitches.
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#11
Quote by victoryaloy
the movalbe "Do" is mostly used in the states.. well thats what i've been told.. I'm sure other places use it as well..

the reason being is that music isn't strong in early education so its easiest to use it as a scales and intervals rather then set pitches.

and it makes more sense.
#12
C = Do
D = Re
E = Mi
F = Fa
G = Sol
A = La
B = Si

Mayor = Maggiore
Minor = Minore
Augmented = Aumentato
Diminished = Diminuito

b = bemolle
# = diesis

7 = sette/settima