#1
I have decent knowledge of the fretboard, and I want to learn the theory behind a lot of things, and most importantly- sight reading. What would you consider the most effective way to do it, and what to use?
#2
Practice, practice, practice. Choose a relatively simple sounding song that you're familiar with (meaning, listened to a lot but never tried playing), and then look up the tabs, and do your best to play it.
#3
For sight reading, you in fact do not want something you're familiar with. If you already kind of know it, you will use that as a crutch, most likely.

I'm working on my sight reading as well. My advice is start very, very simple and work up. Try and look ahead of what you're currently playing. Notice what's coming up before you get to it. Takes some work, but all exceptional sight readers do it.

Other than that, a good book to work through helps tons. I'd suggest what I'm using, Leavitt's "Modern Method for Guitar". Volume 1 of course. It's superb, and very highly regarded. And it takes it in easy increments, one step at a time. Fire up the metronome at a slow enough speed, and go at it. It's been well worth it for me, so far.

Grep.
#4
Know your theory. It sort of helps if you know your major scale theory.

Know the fretboard like you know your phone number. If you know exactly where each note is, you won't have to spend a while looking for it (like I've seen most guitarists do).

Know your shapes. Sometimes knowing the fretboard isn't enough, the best classical guitarists can use shapes. As a song in X major will only use the notes from X major (unless an accidental is noted, which is rare in classical music), you can keep to the X major scale shape. If a note is 2 spaces higher than the last note played on the sheet music you are given, than the next note will be 3 notes higher in your shape. Thus, you can read by following shapes.

Another time when shapes are usefull is in arpeggios. Alot of guitar classical (not so much other classical music) will have alot of arpeggios. You should recognise these on the musical staff and quickly translate these arps to a shape on your fretboard.

Use a metronome and know how to keep a beat. You should hear (in good classical music) a pulse on the first beat of every bar. Notes will be more consonant and you should play the first note of every bar louder. What alot of guitarists fail at is rhthym, especially since alot of us are so used to playing by our own rhthym in free improvisation, aka pentatonic wanking.

So know your theory, know your shapes, keep your rhythym and know your fretb
#5
You can't really sight read from tabs. This is because tabs don't give you any rythm so you might get the notes right but you have no real way of knowing when to play them which is as important as, if not somtimes more than, the notes.

Because of this to learn to sight read you're gonna have to learn to read music. The notes aren't very hard, search something like "notes of the treble cleff" on google and you'll probably get something that you can learn relitively quickly.

The trickier part of notation is the rythm. However, a goole search on that should give you enough so that you can work out simple rythms.

Now you can read notation and know simple rythms, I suggest getting a begginers guitar book with just standard notation (regardless of your guitar playing ability). Then just try and play all the pieces in book. Sight read one then work on it till you can play it perfectly then move on.

The reason I suggest getting a begginer book is that it will probably have simple rythms and notes which will be good, and the pieces will probably get progressively harder. It doesn't really matter if you can play sweeps at 20 notes per second, if you don't know the rythms and notes of standard notation then that sort of standard of piece will just confuse you.

The best way to learn to sight read is to do just that, sight read. A lot. Having a guitar teacher would be good because then s/he could show you the how all the different rythms go, though it is not totally necessary.

To Demonofthenight: Classical music rarely uses accidentals? WTF?
EDIT: Are you talking about music from the classical period (as opposed to the baroque period ect.) or classical music in general?
#6
*Off-topic post*
I've noticed that classical music and baroque music barely use accidentals in comparison to jazz. My method of sight reading is pretty useless when I'm trying to sight read from a Real Book. Except for some of bachs work, alot of baroque and classical only use accidentals when changing keys (or if they're in a minor key). This makes some simple themes and etudes really easy to play.
Romantic songs are seemingly as bad as jazz songs though. But seriously, romantic era classical guitar?
You might say, omg there are 10 accidentals in this classical song. Sure that's probably alot for a pop-rock song, but that's nothing compared to some jazz songs in the Real Books and is still fairly easy to read.
#7
Thanks, and that's actually what I meant (sight reading from actual music, not tabs)
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
*Off-topic post*
I've noticed that classical music and baroque music barely use accidentals in comparison to jazz. My method of sight reading is pretty useless when I'm trying to sight read from a Real Book. Except for some of bachs work, alot of baroque and classical only use accidentals when changing keys (or if they're in a minor key). This makes some simple themes and etudes really easy to play.
Romantic songs are seemingly as bad as jazz songs though. But seriously, romantic era classical guitar?
You might say, omg there are 10 accidentals in this classical song. Sure that's probably alot for a pop-rock song, but that's nothing compared to some jazz songs in the Real Books and is still fairly easy to read.

Compared to jazz there might not be as many accidentals but to say that accidentals are rare in classical music is just wrong.

Also, I don't get what you're trying to say in the bolded bit.
#9
Quote by 12345abcd3
Compared to jazz there might not be as many accidentals but to say that accidentals are rare in classical music is just wrong.

Also, I don't get what you're trying to say in the bolded bit.
Can you get romantic era songs arranged for classical guitar? I've honestly never seen it done. I've seen plenty of baroque and classical era stuff arranged for guitar, but not romantic. BTW, flamenco guitar doesnt count as romantic era.
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
Can you get romantic era songs arranged for classical guitar? I've honestly never seen it done. I've seen plenty of baroque and classical era stuff arranged for guitar, but not romantic. BTW, flamenco guitar doesnt count as romantic era.


There is tons of romantic repertoire and even more contemporary classical works which both use tons of chromaticism.