#1
All I ever see is pentatonic major scales and I've been trying to find complete fretboards of like, prhygian or pent minor scales. Really just as many scales as I can find. I looked up a pent. minor scale and it was the same as the pent. major scale. Hence, they got it wrong. Can anyone direct me to some fretboards? I would really appreciate it
#2
You don't need a hundred different scales, you need to learn the major scale all over the neck, in every key, as well as the theory behind it. Read the theory sticky, as well as the Crusades articles.
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#4
@ archeo:

I do know every position, but playing the same riffs in different keys gets boring and I need to know new hand positions and find out and create even more of my own riffs.

@ AAOOP

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#5
I do know every position, but playing the same riffs in different keys gets boring and I need to know new hand positions and find out and create even more of my own riffs.


Do you know the theory behind it? Are you familiar with the theory behind diatonic harmony?
If you're playing the same riffs over and over, the problem is you as a player, not the limitations of the major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by walkingmacaroni
All I ever see is pentatonic major scales and I've been trying to find complete fretboards of like, prhygian or pent minor scales. Really just as many scales as I can find. I looked up a pent. minor scale and it was the same as the pent. major scale. Hence, they got it wrong. Can anyone direct me to some fretboards? I would really appreciate it

No, they didn't - time for you to learn some theory otherwise you'll never understand scaels.

Many scales will form exactly the same patterns on the fretboard, it's the context we use those notes in that determine what that scale will be, not the shape. As far as defining the scale goes the shape is irrelevant, what matters is the notes and intervals it contains. If you just learn the shapes then you'll end up learning the exact same thing several times over.

Like Archeo said, have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section.
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#8
Sometimes I wonder.

There are like 100000000 of different songs and 12 notes.

Why do you think TS that there are so many different scales needed to make music. You must learn how notes work together, and how they don't work together.

All scales are (in western music) spin off's of the major scale. IT doesn't matter if u learn new scales, if u don't know the relation between them and the major scale.

All the other scales are major scale with altered notes. Those notes are altered for either a harmonic or melodic reason, and named a scale for ease of talking and communicating between musician's.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 23, 2008,