#1
Hey Fellow guitar players !

I've been playing guitar for a little bit more than a year now, and I'm starting to get really tired of the major/minor pentatonic scale. I really feel attracted to Satriani's and Petrucci's play style, so I did some research on the web. I saw an awful lot of sources referring to to Frygian scale. Now, I tried to get some kind of tab.. or notes or GP or anything to learn this scale, but I couldnt come up with anything that could help me.. basicly cause I didnt understand it :P. I was wondering if any of you guys knows a site or something where I can find ,preferably tabs, of the frygian scale, and maybe of some other interesting scale aswell ?

Thanks in advance
#3
Phrygian scale ftw :]


try googling all guitar-scales
Quote by icaneatcatfood
On second thought, **** tuning forks. You best be carrying around a grand piano that was tuned by an Italian
#5
phrygian scale. maybe that's why you couldn't find anything. oh and you should still practice major/minor
#6
phrygian dominant and the double harmonic major scales ftw
Quote by elliott FTW
I LOVE YOU SLOGANKID
silly racist bitch finally kicked the bucket

#7
phrygian mode is the 3rd mode of the major scale
MIJ Rhoads Pro '90
Epi LP Prophecy GX + LP Custom Maple EMGs
MIJ Soloist XL '93 =]
MIJ Fender Strat Kahler
Squire tele '94?
Warlock platinum '90? old shape

Laney VC15

Jackhammer
TRADES????
#8
Basically phrygian mode is the same as a Major scale, but you start on the third note of the scale. So, E phrygian is the same a C major, but your root note is on E. All the notes are the same. If you want to learn the E phrygian scale the notes are: E, F, G, A, B, C, D. Simple.
For those who care.
Current Gear
Cort Zenox Z42
Flextone II
Charvel USA So-Cal
Farida M2 Parlour Acoustic
Admira Hand-built Spanish Acoustic
Blackstar HT-5H
Line 6 M13
#9
The second you think you've got the major and minor pentatonic all figured out, go and practice it even harder. I sincerely doubt you've totally mastered a scale in a year.
Tastes like chicken, if chicken was a candy.
#11
Had it first hit now on google . I really like the eastern sound of the scale, seems very interesting to mess around with. And yes, I will still practise major/minor ofcourse.
#12
Quote by damm_punks
phrygian mode is the 3rd mode of the major scale



just to add on (if ya didnt know(talking to TS, not you damm_punks))

the modes are, simply the major scale, but each mode starts on the corresponding note, thus giving different "feels"

ie, in c major, phrygian being the 3rd mode, you would start on E (i think thats the 3rd.. lol)


thats why you cant find it in GP, as it can be in every key.
*Enter Sig Here*
#13
Quote by Buske6000
Hey Fellow guitar players !

... I couldnt come up with anything that could help me.. basicly cause I didnt understand it :P. I was wondering if any of you guys knows a site or something where I can find ,preferably tabs, of the frygian scale, and maybe of some other interesting scale aswell ?

Thanks in advance


Hey Buske6000, the different modes are quite easy to figure out in at least a basic form, especially if you have a piano in front of you.
If you take a C Major scale and play from C to C on the white notes you have the C Major scale, or Ionian mode. The if you play from D to D, again all on the white notes, you have the Dorian mode and so on through all the different notes of the C Major scale getting different modes as you go.

Eg:
C-C=Ionian (I) | D-D=Dorian (II) | E-E=Phrygian (III) | F-F=Lydian (IV) | G-G=Mixolydian (V) | A-A=Aeolian (VI) | B-B=Locrian (VII)

The Phrygian is essentialy a minor scale with a twist. It's the same as a natual minor (Aeolian) but with a flattened 2nd note.
Standard termanology (spelling?) for music is to number all the notes of a major scale and to reffer to them by number which makes thinking about this stuff much easier when playing in other keys. 1C 2D 3E 4F 5G 6A 7B 8(or 1)C (or I II III IV V VI VII in roman numerals as is often written)
So to figure out or describe scales you reffer to the numbers and compare everything to a major scale.
Eg: a Dominant (Mixolydian) scale (C7 or anything7) has a flat 7 when comapred to the major scale i.e. 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 8.
Make sense? If you took a Major scale (say C) and flattened the seventh note from B to Bb, you've just turned it into a Dominant scale instead of a major scale.
Now, a minor scale (again when compared to a major as is always the case) you get:
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 8. We took the 3rd note of the C major scale and flattened it, from E to Eb. We took the 6th note and flattened it from A to Ab and the same for B which became Bb leaving us with C D Eb F G Ab Bb and C and viola! a minor scale.

The point of all this is to say that a Phrygian mode is just a minor (b3 b6 and b7) with the addition of a b2 so we get b2 b3 b6 b7.
So, if you're playing a song in Am, to spice it up a little, try slipping in the odd b2 as well (in Am is a Bb) for fun making it A Bb C D E F G A.

Hope this makes sense to everyone curious about modes.
Last edited by Peeteey at Nov 23, 2008,
#14
peeteey, thats what i ment.. lol

*bows head in shame* :*(
*Enter Sig Here*
#15
Thanks alot Peetey, your comment has by far been the most helpfull. I've always wondered when I read stuff on the web or watched videos on youtube about guitar playing what Dorian, Lydian and all the other terms meant, but now it makes sense to me, thanks .
#16
ohh, hold up, on the talk about modes, if i was to play in C phrygian,

i just play the first position of C major, but 3 notes (in the scale) higher right?
*Enter Sig Here*
#17
No, if you want to play C Phrygian then you'd use a root note of C and the pattern of intervals 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 8 over a backing that resolved to C, a static C minor chord would work.

If you play the C major scale but start from the 3rd note then you're still playing C major, you just started from a different note. Modes are nothing to do with "where you start playing the scale from", modes are about how a group of notes will sound over different tonal centres.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#18
na i mean, keep first position, but move it up a few frets, that way the notes change, i dont mean play the 3rd position of major, but the firstposition, but starting on the 3rd note, giving you an entire diff scale
*Enter Sig Here*
#19
Yes, and you're stilll playing C major.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#20
how would it still be c major? the notes go from

C D E F G A B C

to

C C# D# F G G# A# C
*Enter Sig Here*
#21
Quote by Hale_91
how would it still be c major? the notes go from

C D E F G A B C

to

C C# D# F G G# A# C



that's not what you said you were doing, or at least not how it read, in this post...

i just play the first position of C major, but 3 notes (in the scale) higher right?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#22
i ment like, play the first position of C major on guitar,

play the very basic, first position box shape.

move that shape, down 3 notes in the scale, and play the same shape.

it changes the notes in the scale to be in phrygian
*Enter Sig Here*
#24
Quote by guitarnoize
Which is:

C Db Eb F G Ab Bb

not

C C# D# F G G# A# C


yes exactly
he was essentially correct except for the fact that you must include all of the tone names in the scale
for instance
you cant use A# and then C
because you need to include the B in the group of notes
(that is if you want to do it the correct way )
hope that helps TS
Quote by :-D
I once saw somebody carry a Guitar Hero controller in a case to protect it. He probably should have packed his testicles in there too, seeing as he won't need to use those for quite a while.


Explorer Club member #4
PM JEST87 to join
#25
Just to clarify (for me). The notes in the scale of a mode are exactly the same as the major scale pattern. But you start on a different root note. So for example, G major scale (ionian), the dorian mode is exactly the same notes, but you start on (root) the second note (dorian=second mode) of the major scale (A).

Is that right?
^Note: Probably sarcastic
Gear
Schecter Blackjack C1-FR
Few Agile 8-strings
Ormsby Hypemachine 2014 otw!!

Carvin X-100B
axe-fx II

W.A musicians FTW
Quote by crisisinheaven
Deep*Kick. You have destroyed every concept of life I've ever had.
#26
Quote by Deep*Kick
Just to clarify (for me). The notes in the scale of a mode are exactly the same as the major scale pattern. But you start on a different root note. So for example, G major scale (ionian), the dorian mode is exactly the same notes, but you start on (root) the second note (dorian=second mode) of the major scale (A).

Is that right?


yeah
that would be " A Dorian"
Quote by :-D
I once saw somebody carry a Guitar Hero controller in a case to protect it. He probably should have packed his testicles in there too, seeing as he won't need to use those for quite a while.


Explorer Club member #4
PM JEST87 to join
#27
Quote by Hale_91
i ment like, play the first position of C major on guitar,

play the very basic, first position box shape.

move that shape, down 3 notes in the scale, and play the same shape.

it changes the notes in the scale to be in phrygian

I still don't understand what you mean by "move the shape down 3 notes in the scale" - you can't move the shape within itself, only up and down the fretboard.

This is why you should never think of modes as shapes...basically because they aren't shapes. They're scales, they have a root note and a set pattern of intervals to follow, and they also require the right backing to "exist". If you start talking about moving patterns around then it just gets confusing because the exact same pattern represents several scales.

If you want to play in C phrygian then yes, you'd use the notes C Db Eb F G Ab Bb ...over a suitable backing. What you play over is the most important part of modal music as it's the backing that actually determines the mode. It's got noting to do with "where you start the scale"...if you use the notes C Db Eb F G Ab Bb over a chord progression those notes will be whatever the chords dictate them to be, and if it's more than 3 chords it's going to start pulling very strongly to Ab major so that's the scale you'd be using. For it to be C phrygian you need to establish a fixed tonal centre of C.


yeah
that would be " A Dorian"

Only if played over a suitable backing.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com