#1
I have a Seagull entourage mini jumbo acoustic and I can't fiqure out to remove the strings from the bridge
#3
Yah, let the tension out of the strings first, then pull the pins out. To put new ones on, put the end of the string in the hole and put the pin back in. Make sure to keep an eye on the bridge pins when you tune the strings, they can pop out sometimes.
#6
DO ONE STRING AT A TIME.....that reduces the "freak out" factor on the neck.....it allows the neck to stay relatively unmoved during removal and installation.

Also, stop by your local guitar shop and pick up an inexpensive plastic "Winder" for your tuning keys....they usually have a slot on the body for pulling those pins out that hold the strings in the bridge.
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
#7
DO ONE STRING AT A TIME.....that reduces the "freak out" factor on the neck.....it allows the neck to stay relatively unmoved during removal and installation. QUOTE]

NOT necessary. Unless you've got a very old, delicate guitar, there's no proof that having all of the strings off simultaneously causes any amount of undue damage to a guitar's neck. It's also a prime time to give the frets and fingerboard a thorough clean up. Old guitars have been found in attics without strings on them, and once strung up and humidified they're just fine. After all, completed necks lay around in the shop waiting to be installed onto finished guitar bodies. If this were a concern, they would all be junk from the getgo. And lastly, you'll only have the strings off for what, an hour or two tops? No problemo.
#8
Quote by Soupy1957
DO ONE STRING AT A TIME.....that reduces the "freak out" factor on the neck.....it allows the neck to stay relatively unmoved during removal and installation.

This is really such an old wives' tale. If you put your guitar into long-term storage, do you not completely detune it? Same goes for flying with your guitar. It's not like the neck is going to snap backward the second all the tension is taken off.

Every time I change my strings I take them all off at once and my guitar has never played any differently. I had to leave my guitar at my parents' for a couple of months, and I slacked all the strings before storing it. Then when my sister came to visit me she brought the guitar too. Tuned it up, and all has been well ever since.

I'd find it very annoying to have to change the strings one at a time... like trying to force out a stubborn bridge pin for one of the middle strings, while all the other strings are still tuned tight. And as LeftyDave said, it's a good time to give the fretboard a nice cleaning.
#9
The "One string at a time" thing comes from arch-tops with traditional-style bridges, since the strings are the only thing that holds the bridge in place. You could still take all the strings off, but you'd have to re-set the intonation every time you do it.
#10
I prefer doing all at once because it gives me a chance to wipe down the fretboard. My fingers are string killers. Even elixirs don't last me any longer than normal strings. Hence, my fretboard gets very dirty. Luckily, my fretboard is micarta so it's a bit easier to clean.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Warping of a neck is a very real possibility, particularly in acoustics.

In the acoustic world therefore, you'll find that more will advocate the "one string at a time" process, than not.

I totally agree that cleaning of a guitar is easier if you take them all off, but the neck and the top surface between the sound hole and bridge CAN be cleaned with a soft cloth, under the old strings FIRST, before changing to the new strings.

There are as many advocates for changing one string at a time, as there are those who say its rubbish.

Here's one example that happens to advocate it: (other than me)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00vzjyBRLDQ

I'll offer you what I've learned after fourty years playing and restringing, and you can decide for yourself.
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
#12
Warping is definitely a more sensitive issue in acoustic guitars than electric, but a neck just isn't going to warp from lack of all it's strings in a short period of time. A few years(even with proper humidity care), maybe, but not in the 30 minutes it takes me to clean the fretboard and change strings. I've kept my Art & Lutherie without string tension for over a month now(since I don't play it) and the neck is straight as ever.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
Quote by Soupy1957

I'll offer you what I've learned after fourty years playing and restringing, and you can decide for yourself.

I'll grant that you have more experience than most of us, but exactly what has your experience been?

I just want to know whether you base your advice on

a) you've always changed your strings one at a time and never had a problem with a guitar's neck warping?

b) you've actually had a guitar warp from taking all the strings off at once while changing them, and you've ruled out all other causes

If your advice is based on a), then you're giving advice based on a logical fallacy. I hope I don't need to explain to you why that is. If your advice is based on b), I'd really like to know exactly how you've determined that changing all the strings at once was the only possible cause.

As you said, just about as many people are proponents of changing strings all at once as one at a time - shouldn't the fact that millions of people have perfectly good guitars despite changing their strings all at once disprove your theory that doing so causes warping? Not to mention that I've never come across a person who can give a physical explanation as to why this would cause the wood to warp, and simultaneously explain why some necks are exceptions to this physical cause-and-effect and manage to stay true despite being subjected to the same forces.

It's just that plenty of well-meaning but poor advice has been given based on "experience" - I personally prefer logic and reason.
#14
If you go on Martin's website their guide shows all the strings off when re stringing. I have always taken all the strings off to clean the fretboard effectively and it takes minutes if that per string to put them back on.
#15
Guitarist Mag issue 281 advises that unless you need to clean the fretboard replace strings one at a time!! So are we all right???
#16
Quote by g1jammer
Guitarist Mag issue 281 advises that unless you need to clean the fretboard replace strings one at a time!! So are we all right???


Does it give a reason why?

Lol, I have to clean the fretboard every single time I change strings. My fretboard gets that dirty in a month.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#17
No it doesn't give a reason...i'm sure if it was bad for the guitar they would have said never to do it though!
#18
I never claimed to be an "expert" in the matter......this is an opinion forum as much as it is a fact forum.......fellow enthusiasts sharing their experiences and knowledge, and openly admitting to those things they DON'T know, for the purpose of "knowing."

For the record, in all the years I've been playing and changing strings, I've never had a warped neck issue, and I've always changed one string at a time.....so therefore, I can say, that it is highly likely that I may be contributing to the lack of warping potential, but doing so.

Also, I never said that your neck would suddenly warp in moments, or during the string changing, as if to imply that the neck was so fragile that even a 30 minute change would cause a warping. Quite the contrary in fact.....I would imagine that very slight warping could occur (almost undetectable in the early stages), each time you totally release all the strings, and the cumulative effect would be more the issue, than the instantaneous.

All being said......it will be up to "Rix870" to decide how they wish to change their strings......and all the rest of us can "agree to disagree" and remain friends, eh?!
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
#19
Quote by Soupy1957

All being said......it will be up to "Rix870" to decide how they wish to change their strings......and all the rest of us can "agree to disagree" and remain friends, eh?!


Haha, don't mind us/take it personally if we sound a bit "negative". This is just the way we(on the acoustic board) start to sound when we get into our more intense conversations(We're nice people, really. ). You should have seen us go on about bridge pins a month ago. Ohh boy. That one was fun. Had to call in a regular who frequents another part of this forum in order to explain it for us.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#20
Quote by Soupy1957

For the record, in all the years I've been playing and changing strings, I've never had a warped neck issue, and I've always changed one string at a time.....so therefore, I can say, that it is highly likely that I may be contributing to the lack of warping potential, but doing so.
See, that's exactly the logical fallacy that I see being perpetuated all the time. I could tell you that every time I change the strings, I do a certain little dance whilst chanting a prayer to the guitar gods, and I have never had a warped neck issue - therefore it is highly likely that I'm contributing to the lack of warping by dancing and chanting.

Correlation does not imply causation. The assumption that it does is the basis for many an old wives tale.

I'm sorry that I'm not being as diplomatic as captivate, but as an academic, one of my greatest pet peeves is the unscrupulous spreading of unverified information. The argument that even if untrue there is no harm done is a weak one. These types of "harmless" folk beliefs often create unnecessary worry, or if a problem does arise, they may cause people to overlook the true source of the problem. Perhaps the harm done in the context of guitars is relatively minimal, but when this sort of intellectual laziness is extended into the realm of sociopolitical beliefs there can be grave consequences... so I personally try not to make it a habit.

Also, I never said that your neck would suddenly warp in moments, or during the string changing, as if to imply that the neck was so fragile that even a 30 minute change would cause a warping. Quite the contrary in fact.....I would imagine that very slight warping could occur (almost undetectable in the early stages), each time you totally release all the strings, and the cumulative effect would be more the issue, than the instantaneous.
Once again, your theory provides no plausible mechanism. There is no explanation for how this warping occurs, or changing strings all at once causes some necks to warp while others remain unharmed.
#21
just go to your local music shop. have them restring it for you, and show you how to do it by yourself
#22
Woa, easy "sunshowers".....you might pop a vein.
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT