#1
Im having trouble with this and my question to you experts is, will a song ever contain more than 1 major scale for example if your playing in the key of C and you wanted to go to F would you want to switch your entire key over or would you want to play F lydian mode of C major scale?
#2
Depends on the sound ur after.

You can do whatever you want lol, really.

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#3
that's no way to write a song, just play what it "feels" good, of course you need the theory, and that is quite important, but, at the end of the day you gotta push that to the back of you brain and play with your soul, you will end up using the theory in an unconcious way
#4
What you should know is the difference in sound between an F Lydian and F major. This will help you decide and understand better how things work together.

First learn all the modes and how they work, and how the major scales works and how harmonies and chord progression are derived from it. Then "forget" it all and start experimenting and using ur knowledge to lead ur composition in good directions.

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#5
Quote by rebel624
Im having trouble with this and my question to you experts is, will a song ever contain more than 1 major scale for example if your playing in the key of C and you wanted to go to F would you want to switch your entire key over or would you want to play F lydian mode of C major scale?

Yes a song can have more than one "major scale" or key signature. This is called modulation.

The most common modulation is from a major key to it's relative minor. The same key signature is used in both parts. Using your example this would be similar to playing in C and F Lydian for example.

There are many other modulations too.

Some songs achieve a swelling effect by modulating each verse up one half tone. For example the song might start in A for verse 1 then up to A# for verse 2 then B for verse 3 etc. I'm pretty sure the song Run Run Run by the Doors does something similar. I've heard a song (I can't remember the name) that do this, not every verse but every bar of the middle 8 (except the last bar which extended the tension of the 7th bar) and it was mindblowing. Using your example this would be similar to playing in Cmajor then moving to F major (not F Lydian).

Songs can also modulate back and forth between different keys. Layla for example by Eric Clapton has the intro, chorus, ans solo are all in Dm (Key signature = 1b) while the verses are all in E maj (Key signature = 4 sharps). As you can see from the key signature these are not relative scales.

Hope this helps.

Good Luck.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 23, 2008,
#6
On modulation - if you modulate to the 4th or 5th interval of the original key, the change in scale will go unnoticed. Going from the key of Cmaj to Fmaj for example gives a "lift" to the music and because there is only one note difference between the two (B flat) it doesn't sound like you've changed key to the average listener.

Modulating to and from 4ths or 5th is part of what is called the cycle of fifths. In theory, this is how all keys are related to each other through perfect intervals.