#1
Well, I've been playing guitar for quite a while now, and (I think) I'm quite good, but my musical theory knowledge is incredibly basic, which I feel is preventing me from advancing in my soloing and improvisation ability. I'm also finding it more and more difficult to write songs, as without musical theory, they just seem repetitive.

So where would you advise me to start on learning musical theory?

I play mainly rock, metal and blues, if that changes anything.

Cheers in advance.
Last edited by TheWickerMan666 at Nov 23, 2008,
#2
start learning how chords are made up. and scales to go along with them. Also learn keys. that alone is enough to keep you going.
I useful tip i found is that if you know what key you're playing in, say Gmajor, and you want a really soulful solo (think knocking on heavens door by gnr) count four frets down. you get to E. play an E minor pentatonig scale over Gmajor and you get a beautiful sound as that is the relative minor
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#3
Quote by charlie__flynn
start learning how chords are made up. and scales to go along with them. Also learn keys. that alone is enough to keep you going.
I useful tip i found is that if you know what key you're playing in, say Gmajor, and you want a really soulful solo (think knocking on heavens door by gnr) count four frets down. you get to E. play an E minor pentatonig scale over Gmajor and you get a beautiful sound as that is the relative minor



That's actually a pretty good way to explain that to a beginner.
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Whats a Steve Vai? Floyd Rose ripoff?

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Behold...the Arctopus are obviously music. I don't see how anyone could say they're not music compared to many modern and post-modern composers. That being said, I think B...tA are terrible.
#4
Quote by charlie__flynn
start learning how chords are made up. and scales to go along with them. Also learn keys. that alone is enough to keep you going.
I useful tip i found is that if you know what key you're playing in, say Gmajor, and you want a really soulful solo (think knocking on heavens door by gnr) count four frets down. you get to E. play an E minor pentatonig scale over Gmajor and you get a beautiful sound as that is the relative minor


That seems to makes sense...

Thanks!
#5
Quote by charlie__flynn
play an E minor pentatonig scale over Gmajor and you get a beautiful sound as that is the relative minor


Um, no.

While you can do that by sliding the pentatonic minor shape down, you do not get the
"beautiful sound" of the relative minor. You get ... G major. More specifically G pent
major. You don't get a relative minor at all.
#6
Quote by edg
Um, no.

While you can do that by sliding the pentatonic minor shape down, you do not get the
"beautiful sound" of the relative minor. You get ... G major. More specifically G pent
major. You don't get a relative minor at all.

Hes right....

Learn lots of chords in as many ways possible. learn the notes on the fret board and learn major and minor pentatonic scales and major and minor scales. Just look at the stickies, lessons and videos all over the interwebz for these things.