#1
when i turn my tone control to 0 it almost turns the entire volume down it just becomes a barley audible plinky sound.even when its at 10 it seems to be lacking how much does the cap effect the sound even with the tone pot at 10?i know its got cheap capasitors in it but i really don't know alot about them the one in it is a square green type with the #2A473K on it the 3 might be a 9 kinda hard to tell.does anyone know anything about that type or the problem i'm having?whats the best kind to get??
Last edited by lilly139@verizo at Nov 23, 2008,
#2
Quote by lilly139@verizo
when i turn my tone control to 0 it almost turns the entire volume down it just becomes a barley audible plinky sound.even when its at 10 it seems to be lacking how much does the cap effect the sound even with the tone pot at 10?i know its got cheap capasitors in it but i really don't know alot about them the one in it is a square green type with the #2A473K on it the 3 might be a 9 kinda hard to tell.does anyone know anything about that type or the problem i'm having?whats the best kind to get??
very little effect at 10. huge effect at 0.

the number is probably 2A473K ... 0.047 uF.

the capacitor may be shorted, or the wiring wrong, if it decimates the volume. it will have a strong effect on higher notes, but the lower notes, like an open E or A should be just as loud. the tone of those notes will be "duller", but the sound should be nearly as loud.
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#3
yea it seems to be sending almost the whole signal to ground i've wired a few and i don't see any problem in the wireing i was thinking it could be the cap shorted or something but like i say don't know alot about'em thanks again to SYK its been a sunday trieing to catch a couple projects loose ends up.maybe i,ll put a new cap in and see if that helps
#4
It seems like the volume is getting lower (probably) because the human ear responds to certain frequencies a certain way. There is a certain "sweet spot" which the human ear can clearly hear, and once the frequency gets higher or lower, the ear notices the sound less and less. When you get to a low frequency because the highs are being cut, it seems less audible. At least that's my theory.
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#5
Whatever it is look at terminal 3. That's where the problem will be and should narrow it down.
#6
you can think of a capacitor as being like resistor who's value decreases with frequency.

In a guitar, it's wired with a pot, which controls how much signal escapes through the cap to groud, so if you turn up the tone, you let more signal escape to ground, even though high frequancies escape more than lows, It still means less signal goes to the amp, so it should be quieter, right?
#7
Quote by jimRH7
you can think of a capacitor as being like resistor who's value decreases with frequency.

In a guitar, it's wired with a pot, which controls how much signal escapes through the cap to groud, so if you turn up the tone, you let more signal escape to ground, even though high frequancies escape more than lows, It still means less signal goes to the amp, so it should be quieter, right?


No. With the pot on 10, there is of course a large resistance to the cap, so you would say that a bit still escapes. However, since on 10, the other half of the pot's resistance is 0, it bypasses the cap altogether.
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Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#8
Quote by asfastasdark
No. With the pot on 10, there is of course a large resistance to the cap, so you would say that a bit still escapes. However, since on 10, the other half of the pot's resistance is 0, it bypasses the cap altogether.

i don't understand the second sentence. what other half of the pot? most tone controls are wired as a variable resistor, not a signal divider (forgot the real word for this). tone controls use only 2 lugs on the tone pot.
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#9
Try a different cap. The .047 isnt always the best for the job. If its dumping to much treble go for a smaller value like a .022 or .01. Ive seen some even use the high value pf caps. You can lose treble thru your volume pot when you turn it down. The treble bypass for vol is popular I put mine on a switch so I can turn it off for different tones. Other ways is disconnect the bridge pup from the tone control altogether. So the tone only affects the neck and middle position on the selector.
#10
This is basically the way a tone control works.
Signal comes in through #2
When the pot is turned all the way counter-clockwise, there is to much resistance between #2 and #3 so nothing happens (all the signal goes through)
When the pot it is turned the other way, the resistance between #2 and #3 goes down so some of the signal (The highs) gets bled to ground via the capacitor.

Various tone controls may be wired differently but the outcome is basically the same.




Another way is signal comes in through #1 and out through #2. Turned all the way counter clockwise, no resistance between #1 and #2 so signal goes straight through. Turned the other way, there is less resistance between #2 and #3 so then the highs get bled off this way. You get more volume drop with this design though. I've only used it on building headphone amps and pedals so a little volume drop was not an issue.