#1
if you are playing over a set of chords (say, C, D, G, Em) would you go C major, D major, G major, and E minor, or would you stick with C major? I'm just beginning theory so I don't really want to know about the other scales, and tell me if I'm wrong.
#3
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
That chord progression is in the key of C major, the C major scale would sound great.


You're wrong! D major is not in the key of C major... You should play in G major... or the equivalent E minor... C major is the IV, D major the V, G major the I, and E minor the VI (relative minor).
#4
It would sound much better if you used G major. The C and D act as the IV and V of the progression (respectively), where G is the root chord (I) and Em is its relative minor (vi).

If you want a diatonic solo, do it over G major.
#5
^ +1 to Morbid Believer

but peaceful rocker gets a mulligan, it happens to the best of us.....

to the TS:

it all depends on what sound you want, personally i might switch between E minor and then playing the relative scales over their chords, the difference when switching scales like that will only be a note or 2 difference.
#6
Quote by tyler_coleman
It would sound much better if you used G major. The C and D act as the IV and V of the progression (respectively), where G is the root chord (I) and Em is its relative minor (vi).

If you want a diatonic solo, do it over G major.


actually that would be a pretty common progression in E minor (at least for rock)

VI-VII-III-i

and in looking at the voicing would be conducive to E minor since it rests on Em, oftentimes a song begins and/or ends on its tonic. rarely is the tonic in mid progression and not resolved to.
#7
Quote by MorbidBeliever
You're wrong! D major is not in the key of C major... You should play in G major... or the equivalent E minor... C major is the IV, D major the V, G major the I, and E minor the VI (relative minor).

You're wrong! Minor chords should represented with lower case roman numerals like this -> vi. If its resolving to Emin like Z4tweeny said hes probably right. It makes sense as key of Emin.

EDIT : BTW Im just busting your balls if you dont realise this on your own.
Last edited by /-\liceNChains at Nov 24, 2008,
#9
My bad for answering the question incorrectly, lol. I must have just read your post too quickly

the E minor scale or the G major is reallly what you need to use, if you think it sounds too blant the problem is most likely your phrasing

I suppose you could try C Lydian, but all 3 of those scales contain the same notes.
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Nov 24, 2008,
#10
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
My bad for answering the question incorrectly, lol. I must have just read your post too quickly

the E minor scale or the G major is reallly what you need to use, if you think it sounds too blant the problem is most likely your phrasing

I suppose you could try C Lydian, but all 3 of those scales contain the same notes.

you can only use the C Lydian over the C chord.... But lets not get into this right now...
#11
Quote by AvengedFoghat
now I really want to know, what OTHER scales could I use over this?
Anything that fits. You know the key is E minor. Pick some scales that start with E - that are minor... E minor, E harmonic minor (best scale ever), E melodic minor, E dorian, E phrygian, etc. E natural minor will work best though because all the notes fit (E minor scale: E F# G A B C D, key of E minor: E F# G A B C D)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#12
Quote by AvengedFoghat
if you are playing over a set of chords (say, C, D, G, Em) would you go C major, D major, G major, and E minor, or would you stick with C major? I'm just beginning theory so I don't really want to know about the other scales, and tell me if I'm wrong.
You can do that, alot of jazzers prefer to improvise this way. This is called "playing the changes" and is generally considered a more advanced method of improvising.
If you know your modes, you can also play lydian and mixolydian over those major chords and dorian and phrygian over those minor chords. Just remember that you always use the same letter for the scale as the chord you're playing over. For instance, B phrygian is never played over G major, but can be played B minor.
Quote by z4

actually that would be a pretty common progression in E minor (at least for rock)

VI-VII-III-i

and in looking at the voicing would be conducive to E minor since it rests on Em, oftentimes a song begins and/or ends on its tonic. rarely is the tonic in mid progression and not resolved to.
Just because a progression ends on a certain chord doesnt mean the progression is based around that chord. If you listen to the progression, it's in G. The D chord acts as a V chord resolving to the I chord (G).
When figuring out the key of a progression, check where it's resolving.
Personally I'd take that Em chord as a Gmaj6 as it sounds like that to me. Theres just no resolution or movement to an Em chord. All the movement is going to the Gmajor chord.
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
You can do that, alot of jazzers prefer to improvise this way. This is called "playing the changes" and is generally considered a more advanced method of improvising.
If you know your modes, you can also play lydian and mixolydian over those major chords and dorian and phrygian over those minor chords. Just remember that you always use the same letter for the scale as the chord you're playing over. For instance, B phrygian is never played over G major, but can be played B minor.
Just because a progression ends on a certain chord doesnt mean the progression is based around that chord. If you listen to the progression, it's in G. The D chord acts as a V chord resolving to the I chord (G).
When figuring out the key of a progression, check where it's resolving.
Personally I'd take that Em chord as a Gmaj6 as it sounds like that to me. Theres just no resolution or movement to an Em chord. All the movement is going to the Gmajor chord.
You do know that TS said "I'm just beginning theory", right?


There's a difference in being intelligent/correct and helpful. This thread deserves the latter.

Sorry if that comes off dickish. Imma make me some pb&j sandwiches
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Nov 24, 2008,
#15
Quote by demonofthenight

When figuring out the key of a progression, check where it's resolving.
Personally I'd take that Em chord as a Gmaj6 as it sounds like that to me. Theres just no resolution or movement to an Em chord. All the movement is going to the Gmajor chord.


^ srsly? sounds like it resolves well to E to me


G - A - B - B
E - F# - G - G
C - D - D - E

3 part shows that it even sticks to the "no more than 2 steps" rule if you use an inversion for the G chord.
#16
Quote by AvengedFoghat
you guys are talking about resolving to a chord, what does that mean????
"resolving" just means "ending on, nicely". If you play the chords F-G-C, it resolves to C (ends nicely on C - it doesn't sound like it needs to go anywhere).

We should go over resolving and keys. You have to know what key something is in if you're going to improvise. To know what key something is in, you have to know where it resolves. So, really, we should get back to square one before you worry about playing random scales over random chord progressions. So, what all do you know about keys and such?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#17
I know on sheet music theres sharps or flats near the treble clef, and you have a set number of flats or sharps for a certain key. I think one sharp is "F". thats all I got to before my lessons were cancelled. if there is a link you could give me thats all about keys, that would be appreciated

and I only asked so I could solo over "Viva La Vida"
Last edited by AvengedFoghat at Nov 24, 2008,
#18
Quote by AvengedFoghat
I know on sheet music theres sharps or flats near the treble clef, and you have a set number of flats or sharps for a certain key. I think one sharp is "F". thats all I got to before my lessons were cancelled.
Yeah, you should work on that. There are great lessons on this site on the subject.

Here's one: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html


This one is only on that subject (I haven't read this one but Freepower swears by it and considering he's quite smart, and a teacher, I trust his judgment): http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_8_key_signatures_and_the_circle_of_fifths.html
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Nov 24, 2008,
#19
Quote by metal4all
You do know that TS said "I'm just beginning theory", right?


There's a difference in being intelligent/correct and helpful. This thread deserves the latter.
Oh, I thought he knew what he was doing . Sorry T/S.

*leaves thread in shame*
#20
Quote by metal4all
I haven't read this one but Freepower swears by it...


I swear by the series as a whole, from start to finish it's pretty solid with and until I get recording my own theory lessons moar then I'll stick by it.