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#1
This is gonna be a lesson on improvisation, which helped me more then anything I ever learned. And i'm serious with this, this will make everyone a good improviser, and it will learn u to improvise over everything.

Edit: http://www.box.net/shared/24xxi04hdm
A Trash/prog/metal song from my guitarteacher which he recorded in 1992 or something when he was 22 years old. He wrote and recorded all the guitarparts, and his solo at 2:50 is insane.


If you don't wanna hear the cool story, and wanna jump right to the lesson, jump ahead to the first bolded line.


My Great Guitar Teacher taught me this, and it totally changed my playing ability.

I came to guitarlesson 1 day, and we always have a lil 5 minute chat about life and stuff. So he invited me to a Jazz & flamenco Jam evening. But he doesn't know any theory at all, so I was like, okay this gonna be interesting. He played with the band, and he improvised perfectly, style and everything. Yet he can't name any scale, and the band totally digged it. I was mesmerized.

He decided to teach me how he done it.

The next week I came to guitarlesson, and he played this totally random chord progression. Something like Am, Cm, D, Dm, G, Fm, F; You get the point, totally random.

I was like, how can I ever play something over that, I can't remember it all. I went completed insane. I tried to play a lead, and as soon as I found the key, the next chord came, and I was completely lost again.

I didn't know what to do. I knew all the scale patterns, and could improvise easily over a Diatonic chord progression. This totally made me look like a noob. Me being the arrogant guy at the time, thinking I was guitargod of the hood, took him on, and say okay, I will play something totally random and you play over it.

I played random chords, and I even went to different time signatures and stuff. He improvised like it was his breakfast. I felt so dumb and unworthy, but he explained to me.

He said, as soon as u focus on a pentatonic scale or any scale or pattern, you will immediately box urself in, because you use your MUSCLE MEMORY instead of ur EAR. He said I had to listen really good, to the chords, and wait for them to come. First few tries went just as bad, but after 30 minutes or so, my ears were "warmed up" or "opened up", and I actually played something over a random chord progression that worked.

The feeling I got was insane, I suddenly took on a totally different listening experience, and Suddenly modes and stuff made sense. I could hear how notes really sounded over different chords. And to this day I'm still gratefull for that.

I didn't made this thread just for the story so..

..This is what u are gonna do.


You record or make a totally random chord progression (at a slow tempo)with only minor or major chords, and start improvising over it, by only targeting the root, 3rd or 5th (preferably the 3rd). Play a note over the first chord, and when the next chord plays, listen and think how many steps u need to go to get to this chord. If u think 2 then go 2 steps up/down. If it's the wrong note, then continue with finding it. If u do this each day (With the same progression), you will hear the intervals between the chords, and everytime u hear that chord, your fingers will know where to go.

When in a few days (Depending on how much u play) u mastered to improvise over this random chord progression, u throw it away and forget about it.

Now u make a 2nd progression and remember; be as out of key/random as possible, to insure you won't fall into "the easyness" of ur scale boxes. You take the same approach, and do this again until you mastered it.

There are several things what u can do now. You can mess with key signatures, or start making progressions with more "advanced" chords, or speed up the tempo if u think u can handle it.

It's essential that you can target the 3rd of every minor and major chord. If you can do this, then you will understand how to add chromatics and when the next chord comes, you will have no problem hearing the 3rd of it. Your improvisations will always sound resolving, even if u add totally random notes in between.

Which notes u do choose in between will come with time, and this will develop in ur own style.

In the beginning, This will be very difficult; And I mean VERY. Especially if ur a theory guy, this can really be putting u down. You will be forced to use ur ears, since u don't know the progression, and it's all in different keys. In the end, you will recognize this to be one of the most valuable lessons ever in developing ur ear. It really will, cause it's beauty lies in it's simple form, but yet so hard to execute perfect.

This is something where a teacher would help a lot, cause he will immediately tell if ur out of key, or land on a "wrong" note.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 24, 2008,
#2
number 1 problem with this. how can a guitar teacher be truly helpful if he knows no theory. you dont have to retain theory but the teacher needs to be able to teach from it.
#3
Quote by iheartprog
number 1 problem with this. how can a guitar teacher be truly helpful if he knows no theory. you dont have to retain theory but the teacher needs to be able to teach from it.


Did u read the lesson? My teacher has a immediate connection between music and his guitar. He listens to a chord progression, and hears immediatly what he can play over it.

He can improvise like you and I can hold a conversation. He doesn't need to think about the notes, he knows em already.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 24, 2008,
#5
i did read the lesson, and it is right at points. theory as an ultimate tool is not a correct, and while that might be a decent way to improvise if you know how every chord sounds, it would be impractical in a real setting. when youre dealing with different tones, distortion, and other effects the tonal qualities of any given note change substantialy. thats when the theory pays off. and although it can be harder in terms of doing more. it is worth because in the end you are doing more right.
#6
Quote by iheartprog
i did read the lesson, and it is right at points. theory as an ultimate tool is not a correct, and while that might be a decent way to improvise if you know how every chord sounds, it would be impractical in a real setting. when youre dealing with different tones, distortion, and other effects the tonal qualities of any given note change substantialy. thats when the theory pays off. and although it can be harder in terms of doing more. it is worth because in the end you are doing more right.


Yes, but this is a lesson on how to develop ur ears.

But to give u something from my teachers playing:
http://www.box.net/shared/24xxi04hdm

it's trash metal with prog elements.

He wrote all the guitar parts, and recorded this over 15 years ago when he was 22 years old. He's so bat**** insane good right now, you won't believe it. And his solo at 2:50 is insane.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 24, 2008,
#7
Quote by iheartprog
number 1 problem with this. how can a guitar teacher be truly helpful if he knows no theory.


Learn from the best of your teachers.

Nice post darren. Might get down to this soon.
#8
Quote by Freepower
Learn from the best of your teachers.

Nice post darren. Might get down to this soon.


Ye check the song I posted from him. He was only 22 when he wrote and recorded it, so good. But he failed in drinking and doing drugs, and it was end of metal era. He did play all over the world, and he's totally sober now. He's such a cool guy to chill with And his skill now is insane.

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#9
Cool. I'll give it a listen when I get home.

And I agree, aural training is just as important as theory (they walk hand in hand), and even when you're "playing by ear", you are still using your theoretical knowledge, just subconsiously in a way, since you already know the notes so well, you don't need to think about them the way you did when you started learning improvisation.

/run-on sentence
#10
Quote by one vision
Cool. I'll give it a listen when I get home.

And I agree, aural training is just as important as theory (they walk hand in hand), and even when you're "playing by ear", you are still using your theoretical knowledge, just subconsiously in a way, since you already know the notes so well, you don't need to think about them the way you did when you started learning improvisation.

/run-on sentence


Ye. This lesson is intended to connect the dots, and understand the scales on a note to chord relationship. It also lets u try out new stuff, since all of ur prewritten licks won't work.

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#11
This seems brutal. Not the song, the song was okay, not to my tastes though... BUT! This method seems like a great improvisation practice whilst training your ear. My god. I MUST try this. Kudos to you, xxdarrenxx.
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#12
so xxdarrenxx what your saying is, that if we do all the stuff you said, we will become master improvisers without knowing theory?
if so, then im gonna try it, but what if we already know theory?
i know alot of theory so would that mess me up?
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#14
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
so xxdarrenxx what your saying is, that if we do all the stuff you said, we will become master improvisers without knowing theory?
if so, then im gonna try it, but what if we already know theory?
i know alot of theory so would that mess me up?


Haha, no it won't affect any of ur theory in a bad way for 100% certain. It will improve ur ear. And the theory will just help. If you do this, at one point the theory and ur ear wil "melt" together, and it will make all sense. You will understand why theory works in a musical way. Theory will also add to ur creativity.

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#15
nice post Darren, but believe it or not I have already been doing this to some degree although would describe it differently. The reason I started to do it is because my sound was getting very stale, I was (still am a bit i'll admit) reliant on boxes and a strict scale.

I decided to teach myself to use chromatics and to break into and out of a scale. Meaning I do what you did by putting down a random chord progression and not looking to find the key of it. If i look at the key before I start to play notes then already in my mind i'm starting within a scale and it becomes very difficult (for me) to get out of the scale. It gets boring for me after making 15 chord progressions and maybe having 3 solos that sound different.

So after I put the chord progression down, I just play a note, any note anywhere on the fretboard and see how it sounds, i look and see what note it is and then start to find other notes i like the sound of over each chord. If I hit a dud note i am learning to immediately bend it either 1/4 or 1/2 step, as you are never far away from a note which will work. I try and avoid thinking "oh that is the pattern of the minor pentatonic", because once you think that then your fingers just want to go minor pentatonic. Try to cut off your brain, fingers and your ears and make them all independant yet work together if that makes sense. It's quite hard but i'm enjoying doing it, I really recommend others to have a crack at it too.
#16
Quote by Helpy Helperton
nice post Darren, but believe it or not I have already been doing this to some degree although would describe it differently. The reason I started to do it is because my sound was getting very stale, I was (still am a bit i'll admit) reliant on boxes and a strict scale.

I decided to teach myself to use chromatics and to break into and out of a scale. Meaning I do what you did by putting down a random chord progression and not looking to find the key of it. If i look at the key before I start to play notes then already in my mind i'm starting within a scale and it becomes very difficult (for me) to get out of the scale. It gets boring for me after making 15 chord progressions and maybe having 3 solos that sound different.

So after I put the chord progression down, I just play a note, any note anywhere on the fretboard and see how it sounds, i look and see what note it is and then start to find other notes i like the sound of over each chord. If I hit a dud note i am learning to immediately bend it either 1/4 or 1/2 step, as you are never far away from a note which will work. I try and avoid thinking "oh that is the pattern of the minor pentatonic", because once you think that then your fingers just want to go minor pentatonic. Try to cut off your brain, fingers and your ears and make them all independant yet work together if that makes sense. It's quite hard but i'm enjoying doing it, I really recommend others to have a crack at it too.


Ah yes, that is essentially the same thing. This is a psychological exercize in such a way that the randomness FORCES you to use ur ears. This is excellent way to find new possibilities, and open ur ears. Alot of time you maybe play cool ideas, but because u see em as a scale, you won't react to it. And the bending thing you described works perfect, I do that to sometimes. With this you will hit quite a few Friedman tricks. And I won't be surprised that he learned some of his "weird" bends, in such an approach.

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#17
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Did u read the lesson? My teacher has a immediate connection between music and his guitar. He listens to a chord progression, and hears immediatly what he can play over it.

He can improvise like you and I can hold a conversation. He doesn't need to think about the notes, he knows em already.


That's not what he asked.
Theory is a descriptive system. How can he be an effective teacher if he can't describe what he's teaching you?
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#18
Essentially what he's telling you is to walk arpeggios of the chords over the neck
as practice which is something I've recommened you can't do enough of. You
don't have to guess though. I think it's more effective if you can see the
patterns change as the chords go by. But, I suppose with enough guessing they'll
begin to emerge. You might as well memorize them ahead of time. I guess if
you find memorizing arpeggios unappealing and find that doing something like
this guessing more interesting, it's all good if you actually do it regularly.
#19
Quote by Archeo Avis
That's not what he asked.
Theory is a descriptive system. How can he be an effective teacher if he can't describe what he's teaching you?


So ur saying that anyone can't describe what he plays, can't make music?

He opened my ear in a way, to if I hear a chord, I can hear what notes would work over it. If I hear for lets say an Amin chord, my fingers will go to a note in the A minor chord. I skip the part, of thinking; Hey that's an A minor chord, 7th fret d string would work, or hey it's an a minor chord, a c or e will work.

He also taught me rhythms, tone control and guitar techniques.

To Edg:

I know in theory it's walking the arpeggios. But it's easy to say this this and this note will work over that chord. This helps in hearing why it works, instead of "it works".

It's basically reinventing for urself how music works in term's of hearing.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 25, 2008,
#20
so you made the incredible discovery that you actually need to listen when you are improvising woaehh *throws away all theory books* dont need it mate i have an intimate connection with music and my guitar cheers

also the solo in that song was nothing but incoherent histrionics
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Last edited by Deep-Sea-Seamus at Nov 25, 2008,
#21
Quote by Deep-Sea-Seamus
so you made the incredible discovery that you actually need to listen when you are improvising woaehh *throws away all theory books* dont need it mate i have an intimate connection with music and my guitar cheers

also the solo in that song was nothing but incoherent histrionics


Tut tut Seamus

1. Alot of people actually do have to make the discovery of 'listening' to what their playing when they improvise. There are a heck of a lot of people out there who are happy to run a scale, not listen to the notes and think that they are 'improvising'. So yeah for some it is a bit of a discovery as you put it.

2. Darren never said you don't need theory ever, as a matter of fact he goes to say that knowing theory can only help you improve. He only mentioned his teacher not knowing theory because it was relevant to the excercise he explained.

3. Darren has helped me with a few things around here recently so if he claims that something has helped him, i'll check it out and not worry about pedantics
#22
Quote by Helpy Helperton
Tut tut Seamus

1. Alot of people actually do have to make the discovery of 'listening' to what their playing when they improvise. There are a heck of a lot of people out there who are happy to run a scale, not listen to the notes and think that they are 'improvising'. So yeah for some it is a bit of a discovery as you put it.

2. Darren never said you don't need theory ever, as a matter of fact he goes to say that knowing theory can only help you improve. He only mentioned his teacher not knowing theory because it was relevant to the excercise he explained.

3. Darren has helped me with a few things around here recently so if he claims that something has helped him, i'll check it out and not worry about pedantics


Thx for defending, but I will reply also.

What helpy said at *1*. About 98% of the youtube vids I see or recordings I hear, this occurs. People may know it, but they clearly don't understand it. I posted this exercize to help people in opening up their ear. I never said theory is BS, you totally made that up. I just feel their has to be a healthy balance between the two.

And the solo is dated; I said it's recorded over 15 years ago, so yeah it's "dated".

He doesn't know theory, but he plays correct if u look at it from a theoretic perspective. He just learned to play guitar different due to the lack of the internet or musical studies around 1990.

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#23
Quote by Deep-Sea-Seamus
so you made the incredible discovery that you actually need to listen when you are improvising woaehh *throws away all theory books* dont need it mate i have an intimate connection with music and my guitar cheers

also the solo in that song was nothing but incoherent histrionics


Er, miss the point much? Do I jump into every lesson thread and shout "I KNOW THIS ALREADY OMG YOU ARE STUPID?".

If it doesn't help you because you're awesome, pat yourself on the back. If you're awesome, write some lessons for those of us who aren't so we may in future get a self-back-pat.
#24
So ur saying that anyone can't describe what he plays, can't make music?


What? When did anyone say anything even remotely similar to that?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#25
Quote by Archeo Avis
What? When did anyone say anything even remotely similar to that?


Okay I misinterpreted, srry.

I mean if someone can't name what they play, but if you would look at it theoretically and it is correct.

Now what if he showed me what notes to play, but he can't tell me the names of the intervals. Like he knows the lydian scale, but he doesn't know it's called lydian. But he knows it's aural use and the notes in terms of sound, and where to play em on guitar.

And he's a guitar teacher, not a music theory teacher. He spend alot of time teaching different rhythms and techniques, and a general approach to stuff.

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#26
Think one thing that needs to be said here, Is that theory is meant to help musical productivity, not hinder it. Its a set of "Idea Generators" as I see it. Things to say "well I could do this or this" thus musical ideas. Most of the tonal theory we have today, was created when people saw patterns in music, and went, "Oh well this seems to often sound nice, when this and this happen" and generated a whole lot of ideas for us to use to "hopefully" make us sound better. Using your ears is a great way to develop your theory, because your ears are "Sound Goood" indicators. Find something that you cant describe theoretically, and go "well that sounds good because ... "

There's another musical idea for you to use.

I dont think Darren is trying to say "Forget your theory because its usless" but even if somone knows no "Theory" they can still train their ears as to what sounds good.

Anyway, thats my 2 cents.

Also, I actually remember reading an interview with Jason Becker, in which he stated him and Friedman used to do similar things. Try and make the soloist look foolish by playing unexpected chords (using their theory to play things that would sound different), so the soloist had a chance to develop their ear, to different sounds of chord movment, not readily apparent.
Last edited by Galvanise69 at Nov 26, 2008,
#27
^ that's what my teacher did, playing a perfect diatonic progression, then hit a random chord, and I was totally lost. And if that happened on stage I would be seen as suck guitarist.

I never said theory sucks, anywhere. I made 2 modal theory lessons; it would be kinda contradicting lol.

And how you described theory is perfect.

Theory is based of music/sound. If you say you only can make good music with theory, means that you imply that theory is given by god, or somehow already existed out of nowhere, and that someone found it and made music with it. I place my bet on the other way around.

Someone can "reinvent" for himself how music should be played. If u have theoretic knowledge, it will be more efficient, cause someone already "invented" it, and he eliminated the bad and kept the good, which is the music theory as we know it. It doesn't mean someone can't go through the same process of "discovering" music. He will learn what his mind and the acknowledged theory shares, and that's the aural effect.

Music theory is only genius in itself. The people that made it are just people, and they are geniuses in their idea of music. But music itself, or structered sound, is universal.

I mean 1 can call the inventor of nuclear power a genius, but someone else might find it dumb that he created something which can and has a few times damaged society; hiroshima, nagasaki, tserjnobyl and the Koersk Submarine anyone?

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 26, 2008,
#28
Mmm, I completley agree.

I just wish we could stop the oppinions of, "It stifles creativity" or "Its like a guy who plans to build a bridge, as opposed to somone who actually does it"

If you dont want to learn theory, dont. Its only there to help you. The notes come from the damn instrument. Using your ear can help you create fantastic music, just as good as anyone who knows theory, no matter how much. So, if you dont want to learn theory, dont!
Its only a tool, past knowledge taken from people, who have used their ear to begin with (I dont actually know how theory started, but I can imagine something like"

Composer 1#: Did you ever notice that ... .... ... is quite common and gives a really nice sound?

Composer 2#: Yeah, that happens all the time

Composer 1#: Hey, why dont we make up some "theories" about guidelines on how to produce nice sounds, and still use our ears to discover new theories

Theory was invented (or at least I think) by guys using their ears, and figuring out what sounded good, and creating a knowledge of how to re-create these sounds, and guidelines.

What you said up there is completley true. While a guitarist may not know much theory, by using his ear, he mahy have discovered that playing the 4th note (holding it) over a major 7 chord, sounds dissonant, he may not know what to call this phenomenom, but he knows it exists, and it inpacts his melodic choices. That is theory, though he doesnt know ego boosting information he can spout off to all his freinds (something im quite guilty of doing, or trying to do) he knows the same theory that helps him SOUND GOOD!

/rant.
#29
Quote by Galvanise69
Mmm, I completley agree.

I just wish we could stop the oppinions of, "It stifles creativity" or "Its like a guy who plans to build a bridge, as opposed to somone who actually does it"

If you dont want to learn theory, dont. Its only there to help you. The notes come from the damn instrument. Using your ear can help you create fantastic music, just as good as anyone who knows theory, no matter how much. So, if you dont want to learn theory, dont!
Its only a tool, past knowledge taken from people, who have used their ear to begin with (I dont actually know how theory started, but I can imagine something like"

Composer 1#: Did you ever notice that ... .... ... is quite common and gives a really nice sound?

Composer 2#: Yeah, that happens all the time

Composer 1#: Hey, why dont we make up some "theories" about guidelines on how to produce nice sounds, and still use our ears to discover new theories

Theory was invented (or at least I think) by guys using their ears, and figuring out what sounded good, and creating a knowledge of how to re-create these sounds, and guidelines.

What you said up there is completley true. While a guitarist may not know much theory, by using his ear, he mahy have discovered that playing the 4th note (holding it) over a major 7 chord, sounds dissonant, he may not know what to call this phenomenom, but he knows it exists, and it inpacts his melodic choices. That is theory, though he doesnt know ego boosting information he can spout off to all his freinds (something im quite guilty of doing, or trying to do) he knows the same theory that helps him SOUND GOOD!

/rant.


you arent going to figure out 95% of what theroy has devised with just your ear
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#30
Quote by Deep-Sea-Seamus
you arent going to figure out 95% of what theroy has devised with just your ear


It doesn't matter.

Unless u wrote a song with every theoretic idea possible. Then your theoretic knowledge hasn't have value to you YET, in terms of making music.

If u write a song, and u don't use counterpoint in it, does that mean it sox?

Someone doesn't need to know all theory to make a song. Cause not every song contains all theory.

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#32
Quote by Freepower
What theory has described.


This. SOmeone who writes songs, needs only so much theory that he needs for a song.

I work like this: I write a song, but I can't find for example a good 4th chord for my progression, I go search for theory what would work, or what would be a good idea.

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#33
Quote by xxdarrenxx
It doesn't matter.

Unless u wrote a song with every theoretic idea possible. Then your theoretic knowledge hasn't have value to you YET, in terms of making music.

If u write a song, and u don't use counterpoint in it, does that mean it sox?

Someone doesn't need to know all theory to make a song. Cause not every song contains all theory.


you keep insisting that you don't need theory to write music but nobody is arguing against that. you need it if you want a good knowledge of what is possible with music.

you argue like music is some magical soul power and everyone has this inborn sense of all the possibilities of music. you have to study and learn to really learn what music is capable of
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#34
Quote by xxdarrenxx
This. SOmeone who writes songs, needs only so much theory that he needs for a song.

I work like this: I write a song, but I can't find for example a good 4th chord for my progression, I go search for theory what would work, or what would be a good idea.


maybe heres a better way to say it. music theory is just a logical system that describes music, if you only ever think of music in abstract terms you will miss out on the ability to really communicate ideas to others (and yourself). your music will always lack organization and structure, something that all great works have, natch. also its just a terrible cumbersome way to go about making music if you just use your ear. You will always fumble around. If you had everything organized in a system (theory) you can so much more easily express and organize your ideas. realize that theory is just way of further fulfilling what you want to hear it is in absolutely in no way at odds with your ear
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#35
Quote by Deep-Sea-Seamus
maybe heres a better way to say it. music theory is just a logical system that describes music, if you only ever think of music in abstract terms you will miss out on the ability to really communicate ideas to others (and yourself). your music will always lack organization and structure, something that all great works have, natch. also its just a terrible cumbersome way to go about making music if you just use your ear. You will always fumble around. If you had everything organized in a system (theory) you can so much more easily express and organize your ideas. realize that theory is just way of further fulfilling what you want to hear it is in absolutely in no way at odds with your ear


That's totally subjective.

If I hear A song which is theoretical advanced, and I figure out the notes and use the chord structures in my own playing. Then I can still play something advanced with just using my ears.

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The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#36
Quote by xxdarrenxx
He said, as soon as u focus on a pentatonic scale or any scale or pattern, you will immediately box urself in, because you use your MUSCLE MEMORY instead of ur EAR. He said I had to listen really good, to the chords, and wait for them to come.
Me likey that statement. I should stop being so lazy and do this. Playing the changes is hard for me. I kinda half-ass both ways by knowing they key and trying to phrase in a cool way. Phrasing won't go too well if you don't really identify what notes you're using. Another good post by you, sir.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#37
Quote by xxdarrenxx
That's totally subjective.

If I hear A song which is theoretical advanced, and I figure out the notes and use the chord structures in my own playing. Then I can still play something advanced with just using my ears.


+1
Yep, you can.

Of all the skills we need as guitarist, I would put listening as the absolute most important.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 26, 2008,
#38
I dont think anybody is surprised that Deap Sea Seamus got banned, guy was acting like a moron in every single topic in the Music Theory section
#39
Anyone else get irrationally angry when talking to a musical zealot of any kind?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#40
Hmm. I was thinking of something similar.

I really want to get good at improvising, so what I thought is I'd make a chord progression with complex chords that modulate between keys (basically, a standard Jazz progression) and record myself playing it really slow. Because of the tempo, I'd have time to decide which mode I'd switch to with each chord and which are the important notes to stress. I'd do this every day with lots of different chord progressions.

Over time, I'd get faster and faster and better and better, until eventually I'll be able to solo with ease over the really fast jazz chord progression you often see guitarists solo over and think "How the **** are they doing that?!"

Good idea or bad idea?
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