#1
well ive been working on my chops with the metronome for a while now
and havnt done much theory

i thot i wuld stop with the metronome for a little bit and start working on theory and work on the solo im writing for my band

will my chops suffer?
#2
Why do they have to be worked on at separate times? Work on them both at once.
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#4
Well you should always, no matter what, be able to tap your foot in 1/4 notes while playin, but I don't think it is a good idea to not pay absolute attention to the tempo when soloing. Paying attention to your chops while tapping into your creativity for soloing may limit your creativity at first, but believe me, it is only temporary.
#5
Quote by sxymnky777
you could do both?

+1

Do them both at the same time - it's much more productive and a far more efficient use of your practice time.

Rather than just grinding mindless patterns when "working on your chops" or robotically following scale shapes when "working on your theory" put the two together.

If you want to do some legato exercises then construct a run from the scale of your choice, same goes for tapping, picking, sweeping or anyhting else. The act of simply making the effort to use a scale, even if it's just to construct an exercise that moves you up and down the fretboard, will help you to learn it....playing that exercise will help your fingers get used to some practical ways of using the scale with whichever technique you happen to be using.
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#6
ino i shuld do both
but im so tired of playing with the metronome
its so boring starting all the way at 40, and going all the way to like 132
#7
Quote by cemetarygates31
ino i shuld do both
but im so tired of playing with the metronome
its so boring starting all the way at 40, and going all the way to like 132


If you can play 16th note sweeps at 60 flawlessly without warming up, start at a higher tempo.
#8
You can't do both? Devote a few minutes(or hours if you've got time) to one and then the same, or close, to the other.
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#9
Quote by highlordmugfug
You can't do both? Devote a few minutes(or hours if you've got time) to one and then the same, or close, to the other.


well just to do one exersice it take like 3o mins
so if i can play a lick eawsily at 40bpm i can start faster
#10
Balance is really important. It can't be all work and no play, because otherwise guitar playing will become mental hell, which is totally not the goal here!

Work on your chops because you are serious about becoming a better guitarist, but always make time for fun.

Also, working on your chops doesn't have to be a grind. Sometimes you can come up with some really fun exercises that can be really productive. For example, a couple of months ago I found a bad habit - when skipping from the G to E strings, sometimes I would barre with my index, rather than "hop" my index from one string to the other, which was resulting in some muting probs and the other fingers having to reach a bit more. So I needed to get the index finger more adept at hopping. Instead of hours playing some of the licks in question super slow, I pretended that the G str was a bass drum, and the high E string was a snare drum, and improvised "drum beats" using only my index finger to hop from one string to the other to fret them. It was a ton of fun, and cleared up the problem in no time.
#11
^

Order of importance -

both > playing > practice

If you must choose one, just play. Although if you can spare TEN minutes for practice you can make noticable improvements if you focus on economy of motion and muting.