#1
OK, let me start by saying I am terrible at Physics...I am doing it along with English, IT and Biology. I plan to do apply for an I.T. course at Uni in the future...

Only thing is, right now I'm really close to dropping Physics. I can't handle it

My question is this: Would Physics be required or important for a course like Computer Science for example?
#2
Idk, i'm 14. Sounds like it might, but once again, i'm 14.
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#3
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Idk, i'm 14. Sounds like it might, but once again, i'm 14.

Why bother answering.

If you want to go into computer engineering and stuff like that it's probably required but it really just depends on what you want to do.
#4
It would be a good thing to have on paper, yeah. But you don't need it.

A level physics is awesome, how can you not be liking it?
wat.
#5
Not entirely sure, but if you've got some clue of what kind of university you're thinking of trying to go to, you should be able to look on their websites, and it should somewhere give you a list of average requirements to take that course. So you can check computer sciences ones to see what they need. But tbh I'm thinking you would need at least some physics for that kind of course, but I'm not sure at what level. Hope that wasvaguely useful to you.
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#7
physics wasn't relevant to what I'm doing, but i did it anyway cos its interesting :p
#9
I'm planning to take A level physics next year... any suggestions on how to prepare?
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#10
You won't need physics doing a computer science course. It would be a very useful foundation to have if you wanted to go into any kind of engineering though. Computer science is all programming though.
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#11
Quote by Karvid
I'm planning to take A level physics next year... any suggestions on how to prepare?


Doing triple award science...

I only did double, so I'm a bit handicapped
#12
Quote by lp345
Doing triple award science...

I only did double, so I'm a bit handicapped

I'm predicted an A in triple science, does that help?
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#13
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I'm predicted an A in triple science, does that help?


Of course
#14
Quote by Witch-king
You won't need physics doing a computer science course. It would be a very useful foundation to have if you wanted to go into any kind of engineering though. Computer science is all programming though.


Well, not necessarily.

In practice, being proficient in computer science doesn't necessarily need a physics background. But that doesn't mean a univeristy won't require it.

See the graduation requirements for the University of Kansas's Computer Science Program



Computer Science (59 credit hours)
EECS 140 Introduction to Digital Logic Design 4
EECS 168 Programming I 4
EECS 268 Programming II 4
EECS 368 Programming Language Paradigms 3
EECS 388 Computer Systems & Assembly Language 4
EECS 448 Software Engineering I 4
EECS 510 Introduction to the Theory of Computing 3
EECS 560 Data Structures 4
EECS 645 Computer Architecture 3
EECS 660 Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms 3
EECS 662 Programming Languages 3
EECS 665 Compiler Construction 4
EECS 678 Introduction to Operating Systems 4
Senior Electives 12

Mathematics (22 credit hours)
MATH 121 Calculus I 5
MATH 122 Calculus II 5
MATH 223 Vector Calculus 3
MATH 290 Elementary Linear Algebra 2
MATH 526 Applied Mathematical Statistics I 3
EECS 210 Discrete Structures 4

Basic Science (11 credit hours)
PHSX 211 Physics I 4
PHSX 212 Physics II 4
Natural Science Elective (one course) 3


Professional Electives (3 credit hours)
Professional Electives 3

Communications (3 credit hours)
COMS 130 Speaker-Audience Communication 3

English (9 credit hours)
ENGL 101 Composition 3
ENGL 102 Creative Reading and Writing 3
ENGL 362 Foundations of Technical Writing or 3
ENGL 2XX *
*Foundations of Technical Writing: (ENGL 362) is strongly
recommended as the third course when enrollment is possible.

Humanities/Social Science (21 credit hours)
Ethics Course: 3
PHIL 375 Moral Issues in Computer Technology
(offered fall semesters only)
Three courses from Humanities 9
(from at least two different departments)
Three courses from Social Sciences 9
(from at least two different departments)


If you want to look more, see pages 10 and 13 of the following link
http://www.eecs.ku.edu/files/undergraduate/Undergraduate_Handbook_Fall_2008.pdf

EDIT:

I reread your post, and I realized, you aren't necessarily wanting to graduate with a degree is CS.

In that case, as someone who has taken many programming courses before, you'll be fine without physics for sure in an intro level course. Typically you'll learn the syntax, functions, and capabilities of a language, along with how it works, etc...and you won't need physics for that.
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Last edited by bigwilly at Nov 24, 2008,
#15
I dont get the people who just randomly select their program because of the big salary opportunities and then they like drop everything... why??