#1
I've been playing guitar off an on for about 10 years which was more off than on but the past three I've tried to play on a daily basis and played in a few bands. I have no problem with playing rythm and have been working on my lead work for about the past year. I play lead guitar in a cover band and it takes me FOREVER to figure out a solo I either have to just listen to it and figure it out or find a vid on youtube of something of someone playing it, but once I have it I have it. Now stuff like the intro solo to fade to black i figured out pretty easily but faster stuff I struggle trying to figure out. Tonight I tried figuring out the lead in "We die young" by Alice in Chains and got frustrated with it. What do I got to do or work on so I can figure these things out quickly? I want to be able to hear a ripping solo and know what the person is doing and how they're doing it. I have no problem getting my fingers moving once I know the parts it's just figuring them out that's killing me. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!!!!!!!
#2
Not sure if it would help you, but I find that Guitar Pro, PowerTab etc... are good programs for slowing things down and listening to them more closely. Guitar Pro now has a new sound engine that makes the background drums, bass, etc... sound more realistic. That is one route. I actually have the same trouble. So I guess if anyone has any suggestions for the above it could help us both out.
#3
A) Buy the accurate tabs and work out the songs you like. The most important part of
this is working out the rhythmic notation in painstaking detail to a metronome. This
may seem to take forever, but never mistake that illusion because that is some of the
best work you can do to further your playing.

B) Really get to know the major scale inside and out in all its aspects -- there's a lot of them.
Do scale studies. This will allow you to recognize where the solos you're learning are
coming from. Then you can generalize that understanding in making your own stuff.
#4
Are there any sites you would recommend for these scales? I know I won't get it all unless I buy a book, but if there are any sites out there that do somewhat of a good job that could be a help.
#5
I haven't tried it yet, but you could look into a piece of software called "The Amazing Slow Downer" (yeah, that really is it's name). It does what the name says, while maintaining pitch.
#7
Quote by F4R3W311
Are there any sites you would recommend for these scales? I know I won't get it all unless I buy a book, but if there are any sites out there that do somewhat of a good job that could be a help.


Mostly you just need to practice the major scale. It's all in how you do it.

A flavor for that is: http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/scaleome_proj/

"Sheets of Sound" http://www.sheetsofsound.net/ I'd also highly recommend.
#8
Quote by F4R3W311
Are there any sites you would recommend for these scales? I know I won't get it all unless I buy a book, but if there are any sites out there that do somewhat of a good job that could be a help.

Guitar Pro can show you just about any scale.

A good theory site that shows some lessons on the major and minor scale is
www.Musictheory.net

A good site for scales if you want a chart (this can be odne in GP just as easy )
is http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/

TS : Everyone have this problem I mean who the hell can hear a blazing solo note for note right off the bat. I might be able to improvise something similar but getting it down spot on I always need the music. I suppose i could by ear some day but the amount of time spent would be rediculous. I suggest you get the tab and use a metronome like edg said or get guitar pro. This will save a lot of time.
#10
Download audacity and slow the song down to work on it. Then you can gradually speed it up and play along
Andy