#1
hey guys i need some help identifying these chords. do you know what the name is, what key/mode they belong to and how/what scale would sound good behind them?? any help with tonal qualities, theory tit bits or advice would be great!! thanks as always in advance!!


G-10-------8---------6
D-10-------8---------6
A-8--------6----------4
E-8--------6----------4
#3
E#5/A#

D#5/G#

C#5/F#

Think of it like power chords on the A string with the fourth in the bass.

You could call them Fsus4 D#sus4 and C#sus4

Anyway as for key Ummmm C#

EDIT:forgot to write the 5's in to note them as powerchords. Ammended.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 25, 2008,
#4
All of them are powerchords with the fifth in the bass.
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#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
All of them are powerchords with the fifth in the bass.


This, but I find the sound leaning more towards a sus chord.

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#6
Quote by xxdarrenxx
This, but I find the sound leaning more towards a sus chord.


Not without some pretty special context. There's no reason to make this more complicated than it is.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
^^Hey guys check his second post it's in Drop D tuning which makes them powerchords with a FOURTH in the bass not a fifth. Could be why you hear the sus sound.
Si
#8
So I'm a little confused, I'm not the TS but I tried to figure this out, for the first one the notes are the I, IV and the V from the Fmaj scale. So these "chords" would be...what?

I put chords in quotations because since they lack a third, are they even considered chords?
#9
Yeah they are chords. They are a little tonally ambiguous.

All three chords are the same structure so we only really need to analyse one
Let's look at the last one... (remember these are in Drop D tuning)
6-C#
6-G#
4-C#
4-F#

Now if we look at it from bottom to top we get F# - C# This is a perfect fifth interval from bottom up. We then get C# to G# which is also a perfect fifth interval from bottom up.

The perfect fifth above the root really tonicizes the note a perfect fifth below. So we kind of have two notes competing to be heard as the tonic. If we take the C# as root (the octave reinforces the root identity of the C#) then we look at the C# scale C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C# we see that G# is the fifth and F# is the fourth. A chord with 1 4 5 is called a sus4 chord since the third is replaced or "suspended" by the fourth.

With the fourth in the bass however one could simply notate this as a powerchord with an alternate bass note. -I just realized my initial chords were wrong since I forgot to write the 5 denoting them as powerchords. oops. - I'll correct now

One could argue just as easily that the F# is the root. (being the lowest note reinforces it's sense of being the root). If we view the chord this way we look at the F# scale F# G# A# B C# D# E# F# and see that the chord is F# C# G# C# 1 5 2 5, or a voicing of 1 2 5 which is a sus2 chord. The third is missing and replaced by the 2 (G#) making it a sus2 chord.

So chords could be viewed as
E#5/A# (an inversion of E#sus4) or - A#sus2

D#5/G# (an inversion of D#sus4) or - G#sus2

C#5/F# (an inversion of F#sus4) or - F#sus2

Also the scale degrees are usually written with normal numbers 1 2 3 etc while chords built on scale degrees are usually represented with roman numerals I ii iii etc.
Si
#10
wow. props to all of you guys for knowing your theory. thats pretty incredible. thanks for the help, now i just have to decifer it all lol. thanks again!!