#1
Well, I play electric every day, but I rarely pick up my acoustic unless I'm on a camping trip.

I love the way this guitar looks and sounds, but it just is so hard to play!!!

It's a yamha APX-6A. It's a thinline acoustic - electric, that I purchased for over $1000 originally when they came out. They don't make this model anymore, and I can't find it anywhere online.

If I spent $1000 on this guitar, it better be easy to play, but it's not. I can play my electrics all day and all night long, without my hands getting tired or sore AT ALL. But I'll pick up my acoustic and play for 30 minutes and my fingers are killing me, it's so hard to play things as well. None of my friends acoustics are like this so don't say you just suck and need to practice more

Is this guitar meant for lighter strings than 11-52 martin sp's? I thought that's the lightest you should go on an acoustic. Although, the neck is as thin as my strat's so maybe this guitar's meant for 9's or 10's? HELP!!!

What should I do to fix this problem of not being able to play my acoustic! It's killing me.
05' G&L S-500
95' Godin LGX

96' Yamaha APX 6-A

Peavey Classic 30
Maxon OD808
#2
I hate to tell you this, but the gauge of string you have on it now is considered custom lights for an acoustic, and by going much smaller, all you'll do is sacrifice tone and volume. The norm for acoustics are .012 gauge(.012-.053). These ARE going to be tougher to play than an electrics strings. I go through this same thing all the time myself. I'll jam away on my SG for a week or two, then pick up my acoustic and it's like my fingers have just gone totally weak overnight. Vice versa if I've been used to the acoustic more than the electric, then it seems like the electrics strings are flimsy and so thin I'm scare of breaking them by doing bends and stuff. It's simply the way it is when flipping back and forth between the two.
Now, having said all that, it's not to say that your guitar can't be made easier to play. The first thing I'd check on is how high the action is. If overly high, those thick gauge strings are going to be buggers to fret comfortably. Also, the amount of fretboard relief comes to mind. If excessive, especially if the guitar already has high action, then it'll be doubly hard to fret.
Check on these two things and get back to us. There's threads galore in here on how to do these very things.
#3
Quote by LeftyDave
I hate to tell you this, but the gauge of string you have on it now is considered custom lights for an acoustic, and by going much smaller, all you'll do is sacrifice tone and volume. The norm for acoustics are .012 gauge(.012-.053). These ARE going to be tougher to play than an electrics strings. I go through this same thing all the time myself. I'll jam away on my SG for a week or two, then pick up my acoustic and it's like my fingers have just gone totally weak overnight. Vice versa if I've been used to the acoustic more than the electric, then it seems like the electrics strings are flimsy and so thin I'm scare of breaking them by doing bends and stuff. It's simply the way it is when flipping back and forth between the two.
Now, having said all that, it's not to say that your guitar can't be made easier to play. The first thing I'd check on is how high the action is. If overly high, those thick gauge strings are going to be buggers to fret comfortably. Also, the amount of fretboard relief comes to mind. If excessive, especially if the guitar already has high action, then it'll be doubly hard to fret.
Check on these two things and get back to us. There's threads galore in here on how to do these very things.

Well, my action is very low, but no fret buzz. I just find like I can't do bar chords without it buzzing due to me not pushing hard enough, and playing things is so hard. None of my friends acoustics are like this to me. The neck also has the perfect amount of relief to let it play the best. should I just look at getting a new guitar and selling this one?
05' G&L S-500
95' Godin LGX

96' Yamaha APX 6-A

Peavey Classic 30
Maxon OD808
#4
You're just going to have to practice a lot, and try not to think of electric guitar and acoustic as the same instrument...they're not, really.

There are no shortcuts.
#5
One thing I have done to help keep the differences relatively low is put a much heavier guage of strings on my electric than most would (.09's to .11's) The difference is obvious. Much harder to play, but it actually even sounds better than those little barbie doll hairs did. Plus, .11 is only 1 guage size smaller than my acoustic's strings, although I know a set of .13 electric stings will still be easier to play than a set of .12 acoustic strings. It's just the way they are made.
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#6
Quote by danyellenik
Well, my action is very low, but no fret buzz. I just find like I can't do bar chords without it buzzing due to me not pushing hard enough, and playing things is so hard. None of my friends acoustics are like this to me. The neck also has the perfect amount of relief to let it play the best. should I just look at getting a new guitar and selling this one?


Then here's what you do. Put the electric away for a while. Don't play it. Instead, focus on the acoustic every day. Work on those barre chords. Work through the pain(without hurting yourself that is). Keep at it for a couple of weeks and all of a sudden you'll find that it's become a lot easier for you to do the things with the acoustic that used to give you problems. And just think, when you play on one of your friends guitars how much better it'll sound then!
You'll also see a marked improvement in your electric playing too as your fingers get stronger and you build more muscle memory for the chords and their fingerings.
Luck to ye!
#7
Practice. Like the other guy who posted, I now use .13's on my electrics. It's the way to go.
"There but for fortune go you or I"- Phil Ochs