#2
The main benifit of a five is the economy of motion given to you by the low B, which is quite usefull. As its you're first bass it's not going to be that much of a difference learning on either really, so I would suggest the five.
#3
id have thought fives would match for playing against 7 string guitars. do they?

so id say 4, for your first one.
STEAM: beachhhhhhhh

Quote by cornmancer
Please daddy, just for one hour.
#4
have you ever played them
you should get the one that you prefer before you choose the one who the others prefer
if you're a begginer, you could get the 4 string
if you're intermediate, you could get the five string
but try them and choose what do you think that sounds better and feels better
Hola.
#5
If you think you are going to use the extra notes from the 5 string get that. If your not go with the 4.
#6
Quote by Captain Insano
If you think you are going to use the extra notes from the 5 string get that. If your not go with the 4.


The idea of the extra string isn't really for the extra notes, it's for the economy of motion.
#7
Quote by badgerific
The idea of the extra string isn't really for the extra notes, it's for the economy of motion.



That's some deep ****.. and so true

But yeah, the first bass i bought was a 5 string, best decision ever.
#8
Starting with a five string or six string is advantageous in that it will often force you to use the proper one-finger-per-fret left hand technique, whereas a four string will let you get away with the baseball grip and so can cause bad habits.
#9
I also have another question. Are all amps universal? Like can I play my bass on a my guitar amp? Or do I have to buy a bass amp.
#10
No. You can play guitar through a bass amp (some guitarists prefer this, most do not), but if you play your bass through a guitar amp, you risk blowing the speaker and input circuitry.

As far as the 4 or 5 string question, it's sort of up to you; have you played them both? I've actually never owned a 4-string bass; I went straight from a 3-string (don't ask, haha) to a 5-string, so I was getting used to a high G and low B at the same time - it didn't take that long to adjust. And if you learned on a 5-string, this adjustment time wouldn't exist. 5-strings aren't really harder to play than 4-strings; if that's what you want, there's no problem starting with one. I also have the GSR205, and it's a pretty nice instrument to start on (Ibanez's also don't have the super thick necks that a lot of 5-ers do)
If you give a man a fire, he'll be warm for an hour.
If you set a man on fire, he'll be warm the rest of his life.
#11
Quote by DJbonedog
No. You can play guitar through a bass amp (some guitarists prefer this, most do not), but if you play your bass through a guitar amp, you risk blowing the speaker and input circuitry.



Crap, now I have to buy a bass amp, and I'll only have $150. Is there really cheap, but good bass amps?
#12
150 is enough to get an ok practice amp, try the acoustic b20
and with the 5-string you can always just use the low b as a place to anchor your thumb; if you don't mind paying a little extra money i don't see why you wouldn't get the 5-string
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Yay fibonacci!
#13
You can play bass through your guitar amp, just don't crank it, that's what I did until I could afford a good bass amp.

Also I started playing with a 5, it's fun and easier to play if you ask me, but I find when I do play a four it's more difficult as the spaces between strings are much larger and I often play the notes one string higher than they should be