#1
Hey guys I've been starting to learn some theory lately and now im trying to apply it. So I want to make a solo for a song that uses the chords F, A, C, D, and Bb all power chords. Do I use any scale that has those notes in it?
#4
You can use a scale that has the notes of the chords (F major) yeah, or you can switch scales up, adding in some flavor.
DANNY

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#9
Quote by punkrocklove999
well if they are all powerchords then you could be simple and just use pentatonics

Since power chords are tonally ambiguous, that opens up some cool opportunities to use other, more exotic scales, so that may be worth a look as well.
#12
This is what you should do.
"Descipher" every chord:
F5: F C
A5: A E
C5: C E
D5: D A
Bb5: Bb F

D Minor and F major fit.

I would suggest something like: D5 - A5 - Bb5 - C5 - F5

If you wanna use triads; Dm - A - Bb - C - F

Sounds good man.
#15
The progression would imply F major, so you could stick with F major or F major pent scales..

MAybe you could play the blues or minor pentatonic scales from some "blues" feel or whatever.

Since they are powerchords, you could also apply another scale, maybe exotic, but be careful of not using very dissonant notes when the corresponding chord plays (like playing a F# with the C powerchord)...

Quote by one vision
This is what you should do.
"Descipher" every chord:
F5: F C
A5: A E
C5: C E
D5: D A
Bb5: Bb F

D Minor and F major fit.

I would suggest something like: D5 - A5 - Bb5 - C5 - F5

If you wanna use triads; Dm - A - Bb - C - F

Sounds good man.



By the way..

DO you happen to have sheet music of that Romance piece of yours?
#16
Using the chromatic scale is not exactly bad advice. Using the chromatic scale does not mean running up and down like those infamous picking exercises. It merely means being able to use all 12 notes which is very very handy. Why limit yourself to scales when you can use all notes.....now in practice yeah you want to be playing around your scales/patterns you know work but adding in chromatic passing notes or landing on notes outside of the scale that still work is when you cans start thinking outside of the 'box' literally. So whilst use the chromatic scale ain't the best advice in the world its a somewhat vague statement which could be translated into ' dont limit yourself to playing inside of the shapes and experiment with 'outside' notes'. Some of the most interesting players IMO come from this way of thinking and jazz in general is full of this type of playing.
Andy
#18
whoa...before we get too technical into what scale works etc...let's not forget this is a power-chord progression.

The only theory you need to apply is this: powerchords are 5ths. The tonality isn't set in stone. Since thirds are what our ears most easily recognizes as belonging to, or centering around a tonality--and hence is the bedrock of western music theory--applying your theory chops isn't that important here.

If anything, this seems like an opportunity for ear-training and creativity. So in other words, have fun and see what works because theoretically, a million things will "work" harmonically. The rhythm of those chords, the resolution/cadences of the progression, might however end up strongly preferring a Fmaj melody(and of course all the things that can be relative to it)

Next time pick a progression with a strong tonality if you want to hone in on your theory-application skills. So for this one, just wail, use your ear(or both if you prefer) and have fun!
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