#1
How do you guys deal with working out songs..eg do you comment on what works or doesnt, or comment on each others parts if something works or doesnt? Ive found some bands can be very technical at this but dont take it personally, others try not to say stuff and then it builds up and becomes a problem.
#2
just be like, " i think this would sound better played this way", or " this part i think will sound better played here rather than there"
#3
Quote by nirvana1163
just be like, " i think this would sound better played this way", or " this part i think will sound better played here rather than there"



i try and be positive and try to put myself down if i feel im am being too personal but i was interested in how other bands do it. i was in a band where the bassist would tape my drums down with sellotape on the bottom skins without me noticing because he didnt like ringy toms.
#4
It can be really hard work at times and it all depends on the personalities of your bandmembers.
The ideal mindset that everyone should have is 'What will be best for the band?' not 'How good will this make me sound/look?'
Everyone should be willing to at least try out someone else's idea for a song, whether that's a complete song or just a new section or a change in an already existing song.
They should all be willing to abide by the majority decision of the band, if you are outvoted on anything, tough titties, remember, it's all about what's best for the band, not the individual.

Everyone has a slightly different view or opinion of what is great music and this is where that well known saying ''You can please some of the people all the time, you can please all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time.'' comes in. It's a logistical impossibility to please everyone all the time and if everyone realises this, it makes things much easier.
Because everyone is different, that means that when writing together, it's all a compromise.
Each member will have their favourite songs in the set, and these will more often than not be different songs for different people, likewise with least favourite songs, so it' important for each member to realise that the cost of being able to play your own favourite songs of the set is to play your least favourite songs of the set, because your least favourites are invariably going to be someone elses favourites.
If you find that no one in the band particularly likes playing a particular song, then that song should be dropped in favour of a ong that at least someone in the band get's pleasure out of.

These are the basic ground rules, and if you set them out before you start writing together and get everyone to abide by them, songwriting within the band should be easier.
Remember, because each individual member brings their own individual tastes and influences to the band, that makes for great variation within the band and songs themselves, which is a desirable result.
Variation means that your band is never boring to listen to so variation is 'good for the band.'
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Nov 26, 2008,
#5
Have no egos. I remember when I first got into bands, everything had to be a certain way, because these were MY masterpieces, and I had a VISION... Little did I know I sounded like an annoying little twerp, and my little 3 chord wonders could have used all the help they could get.
So you gotta keep the lines of communication open, and you gotta be able to take criticism. In my current band, every song is taken through 100 different avenenues, and then when it comes time to record, we go through it again as we work out arrangements. And sometimes you'll have what you think is a great idea, but if 3 other guys are saying 'Dude, it just doesn't work for this song' you have to consider that they know something you do not. This goes for everything from lyrics, to guitar and drum tones, to sonwriting and arranging, and production. If you believe in an idea, fight for it, but respect that the other guys opinions are valid and remind yourself that you're in a band with them because you respect them as musicians. And remember, it's worth it to hear the words 'That isn't working' 100 times if it means in the end you hear 'Dude, that's ****ing awesome' just once.
#7
Quote by koslack
Have no egos. I remember when I first got into bands, everything had to be a certain way, because these were MY masterpieces, and I had a VISION... Little did I know I sounded like an annoying little twerp, and my little 3 chord wonders could have used all the help they could get.
So you gotta keep the lines of communication open, and you gotta be able to take criticism. In my current band, every song is taken through 100 different avenenues, and then when it comes time to record, we go through it again as we work out arrangements. And sometimes you'll have what you think is a great idea, but if 3 other guys are saying 'Dude, it just doesn't work for this song' you have to consider that they know something you do not. This goes for everything from lyrics, to guitar and drum tones, to sonwriting and arranging, and production. If you believe in an idea, fight for it, but respect that the other guys opinions are valid and remind yourself that you're in a band with them because you respect them as musicians. And remember, it's worth it to hear the words 'That isn't working' 100 times if it means in the end you hear 'Dude, that's ****ing awesome' just once.

Nicely put sir.
#8
yes nicely put.

we will always try out everyones ideas a few times, get it tight, then think, does it sound good? if not move on. recommend parts to each other, ask ideas or how does something sound a very open relationship is key. be comfortable with hearing "no". if you can take it, so can they. constructive critisism is always good. its not about having your part the one, its about getting the sound from the band. and work with them to get it right.dont blow off an idea because its go an odd transition that you guys dont nail the first time.

not as well put but my try