#1
Well, a friend of mine is a huge Three Days Grace fan, and I remembered seeing Animal I've Become on the easy bass list, and thought I'd learn it and play it for him. Then I saw this:
Tuning: C, G, C, F

Really? They had to change EVERY string?

Well, that really wasn't a question, but this is; how would I flat tune? All me tuner has besides the tuner is a black line a little off on each side with "20" by it (+ and - respectively); does that sound about right for flat? I know it's exactly between the note and the one below it, and equals that ones sharp, but there's no indication of that besides the lines with the 20's by them.
#2
Sorry to be kind a dick but I suggest getting a chromatic tuner then you can tune to whatever note you desire
This works for almost any situation....

Quote by PaulyVengeance
Punch it. Punch it until it goes away.
#3
Quote by Rock? Anyone
Sorry to be kind a dick but I suggest getting a chromatic tuner then you can tune to whatever note you desire

I'm broke. All my money's going to new strings, so yeah, I'm working on it, but that's gonna be awhile.
#5
you tune each string down 2 frets, and the low E down 4 if i remember correctly, and if that helps...its just like drop d tuning, but lower
#6
how about listening to the song and tuning relative... if your ears are good enough
#7
Quote by lt22
how about listening to the song and tuning relative... if your ears are good enough

I can't tune by ear. And I just wanted to find a way to tune flat...
#8
Quote by Chasec718
you tune each string down 2 frets, and the low E down 4 if i remember correctly, and if that helps...its just like drop d tuning, but lower

That sounds like it's for a specific flat tuning (I'm guessing Db Ab Db Gb). I'm looking for a general rule.
#9
your going down 2 full steps on the E string so put your finger on the 4th string and tune it to E.

your going down 1 full step on the rest of the strings so put your finger on the 2nd fret and tune those to A , D & G
#10
Quote by mike_157
your going down 2 full steps on the E string so put your finger on the 4th string and tune it to E.

your going down 1 full step on the rest of the strings so put your finger on the 2nd fret and tune those to A , D & G
Why would you tune the E down more than any other?
#11
The tuning is a drop tuning, similar to Drop D in fact. Drop D is a standard tuned bass, EADG, with the E string dropped by one step, thus becoming DADG. This tuning is Drop C. It's a bass tuned to D Standard, DGCF, with the low D string dropped to C, which makes it CGCF.

The best way to tune to this would be to play the 3rd fret of your A String, then play your open E string, and drop the tuning of the E untill the notes match.
Then play the fifth fret of the A string and the open E string(which is now a low C) and drop the A string untill it matches.
Then play the fifth fret harmonic on the A/G string and the 7th fret harmonic on the D string, and drop the D down untill it the notes match.
Repeat the harmonc technique with the next string, and voila: You're in Drop C tuning.

Be warned, though, it's a pretty low tuning so your bass might sound kinda...loose and clanky. You generally need an intonation or action change for this kinda tuning, but it should be fine to just play one song in.

I'm probably very bad at phrasing things, so if you didn't understand a word I just said, let me know and I'll try help some more. =)
#13
But what I'm having trouble with is flat. How do you just tune flat, because I've seen songs that require Eb Ab Db Gb. I need to know how to tune flats...
#14
Consider the flats sharp. For example, Eb is D#. You should know where D# sharp is on your fretboard, so hit that note, play the open E, tune untill the notes match. Then use the 5th and 7th fret harmonic technique to tune all the strings relatively.
#15
Will the 5th fret on the E still sound like an open on the A once their both tuned flat? And if so, I'm assuming it'll work on all the strings?
#16
The fifth fret on the E string tuned to Eb will be Ab, yeah. It's a standard tuning so all the same principles apply.
#17
Quote by RJayZ
The fifth fret on the E string tuned to Eb will be Ab, yeah. It's a standard tuning so all the same principles apply.

Okay, cool. Then I just have to tune the E to Eb and then it's easy, and I think someone said how to do that in here.
#18
Quote by RJayZ

The best way to tune to this would be to play the 3rd fret of your A String, then play your open E string, and drop the tuning of the E untill the notes match.
Tune an OPEN E to match a 3RD FRET A? Wouldn't the string snap?
#19
Quote by herby190
Tune an OPEN E to match a 3RD FRET A? Wouldn't the string snap?

It probably would if you tuned up. The 3rd Fret on the A string produces the note C. So when you tune the Open E to match the C on the 3rd fret, you want to tune it an octave lower than the C you're playing. Do you know what I mean? Sort of like how the 7th fret of the A string is E, but an octave higher than the open E.
#20
Quote by RJayZ
It probably would if you tuned up. The 3rd Fret on the A string produces the note C. So when you tune the Open E to match the C on the 3rd fret, you want to tune it an octave lower than the C you're playing. Do you know what I mean? Sort of like how the 7th fret of the A string is E, but an octave higher than the open E.

...I don't think I can do that........I can't tell which notes are which...and how is a C equal to a Eb, which is what I want the E string to sound like.
#21
Quote by Ryker24
http://www.tunemybass.com/

this will be your friend



I hate to quote myself, but you can imput any tuning you want into here and it will put a tone through your speakers that you can tune to, so you dont have to worry about that complicated stuff, but it is nice to know if you cant acess a computer or a tuner
#22
Quote by Ryker24
I hate to quote myself, but you can imput any tuning you want into here and it will put a tone through your speakers that you can tune to, so you dont have to worry about that complicated stuff, but it is nice to know if you cant acess a computer or a tuner

I don't want to have to go up to my computer when I need to tune, seeing as it's also my moms work computer, and she uses it alot, and because tuning off of the computer just seems like a bad idea to me...
#23
Quote by herby190
...I don't think I can do that........I can't tell which notes are which...and how is a C equal to a Eb, which is what I want the E string to sound like.

Ah, I was assuming you wanted to play Animal I Have Become, which is in Drop C tuning.

If you want to tune to Eb, fret the 1st fret on the D string, play it and let it ring out, then play your open E string. You should hear a lot of dissonance, sort of like a warbling sound, or a wave of sound. That's telling you where to go. Start tuning your E string down slowly, and you'll start to hear the warbling sound fade away as the notes begin to match. If you tune too far down, you'll hear a slightly different but similar kind of noise, which means you've gone too far. Bring it back up. After fiddling with it for a little bit, eventually you'll find the note and your E string will be now tuned to Eb.

It's a pain to learn how to do and it took me a long time to be able to do it as quickly as I can now, but it really is worth the effort. You need to learn how to tune relatively and by ear, because sometimes you're going to have to. At band practices, or at jams, or if you're lucky, at gigs, there's going to be a time when you slip a little out of tune and you have maybe 30 seconds to quickly bring yourself back in tune.
#24
Quote by RJayZ
Ah, I was assuming you wanted to play Animal I Have Become, which is in Drop C tuning.

If you want to tune to Eb, fret the 1st fret on the D string, play it and let it ring out, then play your open E string. You should hear a lot of dissonance, sort of like a warbling sound, or a wave of sound. That's telling you where to go. Start tuning your E string down slowly, and you'll start to hear the warbling sound fade away as the notes begin to match. If you tune too far down, you'll hear a slightly different but similar kind of noise, which means you've gone too far. Bring it back up. After fiddling with it for a little bit, eventually you'll find the note and your E string will be now tuned to Eb.

It's a pain to learn how to do and it took me a long time to be able to do it as quickly as I can now, but it really is worth the effort. You need to learn how to tune relatively and by ear, because sometimes you're going to have to. At band practices, or at jams, or if you're lucky, at gigs, there's going to be a time when you slip a little out of tune and you have maybe 30 seconds to quickly bring yourself back in tune.

I'm gonna work on relative tuning for now, because I'm only in my second month of playing, so how the strings sound open isn't really second nature yet, although I'm getting there.
#25
By learning one, you'll likely learn the other. Just remember, always tune up to standard with your tuner first, then try de-tuning or re-tuning etc.
#26
Quote by Divided_Eye
tune up normally, then hit a C on another string and tune your low E to C. then proceed in similar fashion from there.



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