#1
Im confused with the major scale and playing its modes over chords, say the chord progression is E C D B for example. Could I play E ionian or any of its modes over the E chord and move the entire scale to follow the chord change using the ionian shape as a guideline to what key Im in? Do the modes just express different moods from the major scale itself meaning Icould play any mode from the scale itself (i.e. I play G# phrygian and some F# Dorian together over the E chord being modes of the E major scale?)and have it be in the same key of the E chord??? Sorry if hard to understand this was hard for me to phrase
#3
Not really. When you see that progression you can do either, e ionian, e lydian, or e mixolydian. Same goes for the rest. To do what you were saying is just playing E Ionian because E Ionian and F# Dorian are the same thing. The only difference is the note that you start and end on, and you don't want to start and end on a F# over an Emaj
#4
Ionian and Lydian works over Maj7 chords, Mixolydian works over 7 chords. Dorian, phrygian, and Aeolian work over -7 chords. Finally Locrian works over -7b5chords. Say you are playin a song in CMaj, and the chords go Cmaj Fmaj D-7 G7. Use modes by playing C Lydian instead of Ionian on the first chord, Then do F ionian or lydian, Then play D aeolian, and then end it with G Mixolydian.
#5
Quote by Nike-Man
Ionian and Lydian works over Maj7 chords, Mixolydian works over 7 chords. Dorian, phrygian, and Aeolian work over -7 chords. Finally Locrian works over -7b5chords. Say you are playin a song in CMaj, and the chords go Cmaj Fmaj D-7 G7. Use modes by playing C Lydian instead of Ionian on the first chord, Then do F ionian or lydian, Then play D aeolian, and then end it with G Mixolydian.


That is a C major progression, and you would play C major over it. Modes don't enter into it at all.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
That is a C major progression, and you would play C major over it. Modes don't enter into it at all.


Where is there a rule that says that?
#7
Quote by Nike-Man
Where is there a rule that says that?


Well, there's the definition of "mode" for one.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Nike-Man
Welp we'll just have to agree to disagree


No, it's not that simple. What you stated was incorrect, and the TS needs to know that modes don't work that way. You should educate yourself as well. Start by reading the Crusades articles.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Okay do you think I could get a example progression and my scale/mode options over each chord?
#12
Nate - are those chords major chords or power chords? If power chords (which makes more sense) you have:
E (E & B notes)
C (C & G notes)
D (D & A notes)
B (B & F# notes)

Since the song starts and repeats on E that usually means we're in some type of 'E' key. Based on the notes above that is E minor, so you'd just play in E minor for the whole song.

The key of E major has a C# and D# so you know you're not in the key of E major. Most songs or chord progressions are in one key meaning you can just play the key scale throughout the progression, but trying to emphasize the chord tones for each chord to outline the progression better.
#13
E,C,D and B could be in the key of Em or G major (Em, C, D, Bm). You could play modes associated with G or E.

I would suggest that E phrygian, Aeolian or Dorian would sound good over the Em chords.
You could try a G myxolydian or an E phrygian over the C. (both of these are actually c major scales, but using G or E as your root).

Try an E dorian over the D chord.

As for the Bm, try E lydian.

I think the chords could also be described as a phrygian chord progression in the key of C (Em, C, Dm, Bdim).

I concede I may be talking rubbish as I don't have a guitar with me right now and I'd want to try some of this out before offering a more confident answer.

There are probably other scales that work well over a chord progression like this, but I would need more time to try them out I'm afraid.

E phryigian = C major
E Aeolian = G major
E dorian = D major
G myxolidian = C major
E lydian = B major

Let me know if that makes any sense.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge" - Albert Einstein
#14
I'd have to agree with arch.

Unless you're playing the changes (which you're not) or if it's a modal progression (which it isn't), you won't be using modes to solo.

You could do some freaky thing where you write a non-improvised melody in a different mode to the accompaniment, but that's (amazingly) hard (I think Ellington used to do this, not sure).

The best thing you could do (and what most people on this forum would suggest for you) is to play Eminor over the whole thing. Save modes till you've learnt your theory.
Quote by ChangingAString
E,C,D and B could be in the key of Em or G major (Em, C, D, Bm). You could play modes associated with G or E.

I would suggest that E phrygian, Aeolian or Dorian would sound good over the Em chords.
You could try a G myxolydian or an E phrygian over the C. (both of these are actually c major scales, but using G or E as your root).

Try an E dorian over the D chord.


As for the Bm, try E lydian.
If you're talking about a playing the changes sort of thing, the mode you use will almost always have the same tonal center as the root of the chord playing. You're not playing E phrygian over a Cmaj chord (if we're still talking about playing the changes), you're playing C ionian.

The notes of the E dorian mode with a Dmaj context (meaning a D chord playing) will mean D ionian.

The notes of the E lydian mode with a Bm context just wouldn't work. You'd get b4's and other horrible notes.
Quote by ChangingAString
I think the chords could also be described as a phrygian chord progression in the key of C (Em, C, Dm, Bdim).
Trust me on this, that's a very un-phrygian progression. A phrygian progression based around C would be: C (minor or major, whatever), Dbmaj, Ebmaj.


To T/S
If you really want to play the changes these are your options:

Em - E melodic minor or E harmonic minor, possibly E dorian or E phrygian or E aeolian
Cmaj - C ionian or C lydian or C mixolydian
Dmaj - D ionian or D lydian or D mixolydian
Bmaj - B Mixolydian b6 or B Phrygian dominant

Keeping in mind this method of improvising is incredibly difficult and so very few non-jazz musicians do it.
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