#1
ok, I need someone with a talent for explaining things here.

I'm always hearing that the minor pentatonic scale is a 'rock sounding' scale.

how the hell does just five notes sound like any rock tune ever written? I know I'm probably getting the wrong end of the stick, but I don't undestand it when people say that alot of rock is done in this scale. HOW??

All the rock riffs and solo's i'm learning use notes that don't appear in this scale, so why is it that people marry rock music with the minor penatonic scale so much? It's just five notes for gods sake..

cheers
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Quote by zimmzimmer
Maybe your Dads pissed because hes shooting blanks :P
#3
Quote by demonofthenight
Phrasing and what's being played underneath


I guess I'm just frustrated with trying to learn but not getting it.
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Quote by zimmzimmer
Maybe your Dads pissed because hes shooting blanks :P
#4
It's how they use the pentatonic. Obviously if you play the scale up and down it's not going to sound like rock. You need to give it the rock feel by using bends, syncopation and all that crap.

Stairway to Heaven is built off the A minor pentatonic, and the solo IS just the A minor pentatonic.
"Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, your eyes will get sore after a while."
#5
Quote by mattiwillohouse
I guess I'm just frustrated with trying to learn but not getting it.
Nothing wrong my friend, here's a repost for you:

First off, improve your phrasing.

Try to phrase yourself like a singer. Think of it as if you're singing with your guitar. Listen to some singing melodies and try to copy it on your guitar.

Next learn 2 or 3 shapes from a pentatonic scale. Try to become good at moving between each shape and try to be able to play 4 or 5 notes on the same string. This will help your phrasing majorly.

When you get good, play over some backing tracks. You should be able to hear the chord progression and hear which notes are stressed (first beat of every bar). On these stressed notes, try to play chord tones of the chord playing.

Also, learn your theory.

You shouldnt be afraid to use other guys licks (like when uncreativity hits), but you shouldn't ever overuse licks. It's unoriginal, cheap and improvisation sounds so much better.

It's how they use the pentatonic. Obviously if you play the scale up and down it's not going to sound like rock. You need to give it the rock feel by using bends, syncopation and all that crap.

Stairway to Heaven is built off the A minor pentatonic, and the solo IS just the A minor pentatonic.
I agree, but you got to use musical bends. You can't bend randomly. You should be bending towards a specific note, like say you might hit an out of key note and bend it untill it's in key. Bending randomly sounds noobish and you can pick a noob from a pro so easily because they're randomly bending.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Nov 26, 2008,
#6
Quote by mattiwillohouse
ok, I need someone with a talent for explaining things here.

I'm always hearing that the minor pentatonic scale is a 'rock sounding' scale.

how the hell does just five notes sound like any rock tune ever written? I know I'm probably getting the wrong end of the stick, but I don't undestand it when people say that alot of rock is done in this scale. HOW??

All the rock riffs and solo's i'm learning use notes that don't appear in this scale, so why is it that people marry rock music with the minor penatonic scale so much? It's just five notes for gods sake..

cheers


5 notes (and combinations of notes) played over 4 octaves with extra emphasis and perfumery here and there. If you multiply 5 notes by the 4+ octaves on the guitar you get 20+ possibilities...

First thing you need to do is get comfortable with all the shapes and moving between them all up and down the neck. Don't just stick to one shape/one location on the fretboard for the whole solo. Then work in some slides, bends, double stops, vibrato and even chords to make them flow.
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
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Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
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#7
Quote by mattiwillohouse


All the rock riffs and solo's i'm learning use notes that don't appear in this scale, so why is it that people marry rock music with the minor penatonic scale so much? It's just five notes for gods sake..



Most of the other scales are just 7 notes. So, somehow it doesn't appear to be sheer
quantity of different notes in a scale that goes into making music. Something to think
about.

A scale is a structure that you can use to build music on. You can use the scale and not
necessarily use only notes in the scale.
#8
A good example of a riff on A minor pentatonic, is the "heavy" riff on Carry On My Wayward Son by Kansas. Played with pinched harmonics and palm muting it can even sound metal

So it's mainly how you play something, rather than what you play. Some ska songs played with wah and a funky style can sound like James Brown. But it's the notes themselves that give out that rock/blues feel.
My gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
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#9
Quote by mattiwillohouse
ok, I need someone with a talent for explaining things here.

I'm always hearing that the minor pentatonic scale is a 'rock sounding' scale.


what a scale sounds like is entirely dependent on the context, however the minor pentatonic scale is used in alot of rock songs, especially classic rock songs and metal, so it is not unreasonable for someone to say that the minor pentatonic is a " rock sounding scale". All they are really saying is that the scale is commonly associated with a particular style ....... which it is.

Quote by mattiwillohouse
how the hell does just five notes sound like any rock tune ever written?


I'm quite sure that no one has ever implied that playing the minor pentatonic scale will sound like "every rock tune ever written". you're really making too much out of this.

Quote by mattiwillohouse

I know I'm probably getting the wrong end of the stick, but I don't undestand it when people say that alot of rock is done in this scale. HOW??


It is. just except it and get over it.


Quote by mattiwillohouse

All the rock riffs and solo's i'm learning use notes that don't appear in this scale, so why is it that people marry rock music with the minor penatonic scale so much? It's just five notes for gods sake..

cheers


The fact that the minor pentatonic scale has been commonly used in rock riffs and solos does not in any way mean that other scales aren't or can't be used.
"For gods sake" get it through your head that when someone makes an association based on common use that they are not in any way telling you that you must write your music based on that association.

in other words, yes, the minor pentatonic scale is very common in rock and metal, but no you certainly don't have to use that scale when you are writing a rock or metal riff.

it's simply an association based on common usage. For example country guitarists often play telecasters and wear cowboy hats. it's true, but you don't have to do that to be considered a country guitarist. You can do whatever you want. It's your music.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 26, 2008,
#10
Judging by your Green Day avatar, you may have a different idea of "rock" than other people here. The minor pent is really overused in classic rock. Not so much in most kinds of modern rock.