#3
a good diea would be the blues minor scale...after that you could just experiment with other scales such as harmonic minor and melodic minor as well as them odes (Aeolian, Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Locrian) and fise it in with your bluesy style...i guess it dependso n what you wantt o do but theres no harm in learning and experimenting with more but should defiantlyl earn blues scales saying as you play blues
#4
Quote by Mihyaeru
a good diea would be the blues minor scale...after that you could just experiment with other scales such as harmonic minor and melodic minor as well as them odes (Aeolian, Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Mixolydian, Lydian, Locrian) and fise it in with your bluesy style...i guess it dependso n what you wantt o do but theres no harm in learning and experimenting with more but should defiantlyl earn blues scales saying as you play blues


Why on earth would you learn harmonic/melodic minor or modes before you've got the major scale down?

I'd say blues scale as that's an easy step from the minor pentatonic, but then get started on the major scale. That's probably the most important scale you'll need to know for most kinds of music.
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#5
Just add notes between the pentatonic in constant patterns, you'll end up with your own scales, AKA blends of anything else.
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#6
Anyone actually know what the blues scale really is? It's a pentatonic minor scale with an added b5th, which should always considered as an accidental option when improvising.

Harmonic minor scales? lol. Minor scales are for writing minor based music. They're complicated in the fact that you don't only use one at a time (ie, not just harmonic minor or just melodic minor or just natural minor), you use a combination. There a a small list of rules surrounding how to properly use minor scales.

Simpler than minor scales is using the the major scale. Learn major scale theory inside out, T/S, that's your next step.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Anyone actually know what the blues scale really is? It's a pentatonic minor scale with an added b5th, which should always considered as an accidental option when improvising.

Actually, nobody should know; there's no "the blues scale". You gave the minor blues scale, but there's also a major blues scale.
#10
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
I've also heard as the minor blues scale being reffered to as "the" blues scale

Usually it is, but it's still incorrect and it's still important to know that the major blues scale exists and sounds great IMO.
#11
The other night I went to an "open Jam", i would ask the guy "What key is this in"

hes like..
"A blues"

i could figure out what he was playing at first, it was wierd, turned out he was in G major, i had no idea what he was thinking.

That being said, the dude was really amazing, and didnt even know what key he was in, or the names of the chords he was playing
#12
Quote by :-D
Usually it is, but it's still incorrect and it's still important to know that the major blues scale exists and sounds great IMO.
I'm interested. What's the scale formula?


My point before about the blues scale is that some people are too eager to learn scales and expect an almost formula for writing a solo. Whenever anyone is using pentatonics, they should also be prepared to use every other note thats not in the scale as accidentals, the b5'th is the most common of these accidentals.

Let me give you an example. If I write a song and I say it's in the scale of A major, but at some point in time I've used all 12 notes as out of scale notes, am I in the scale of A major or am I using the chromatic scale?
#13
The major blues is simply the same as the major pent, only its the blues scale. take for instance A minor and C major. The C major blues scale is simply the A minor blues scale played, starting on C though. its the same as pentatonics but with that one extra note. correct me if i'm wrong
#14
^That's not quite right. The formula for the major blues scale is 1 2 b3 3 5 6, same as the major pentatonic except with a b3 thrown in. It sounds especially good when you play a lick with a quick move from the b3 to the 3 then land on the root to emphasize the major tonality. The scale is great over major seventh and major sixth chords for starters.

Demon, I see your point and wholeheartedly agree; I was just pointing out that a lot of people are unaware that the major blues scale exists.
#17
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
The other night I went to an "open Jam", i would ask the guy "What key is this in"

hes like..
"A blues"

i could figure out what he was playing at first, it was wierd, turned out he was in G major, i had no idea what he was thinking.

That being said, the dude was really amazing, and didnt even know what key he was in, or the names of the chords he was playing



the minor of Gmajor is A. Therefor, A pentatonic/blues minor would fit in. As would playing G major.
#18
Quote by Dan_M_G
the minor of Gmajor is A. Therefor, A pentatonic/blues minor would fit in. As would playing G major.

No. The relative minor of G major is E minor. A Dorian would be based on G major, that's about the only relation.
#21
Quote by :-D
No. The relative minor of G major is E minor. A Dorian would be based on G major, that's about the only relation.


heheh... yeah, wasnt totally in gear there was i.
#22
The arabian and gypsy scales are really good for different sounding blues. Learn them.
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#23
Quote by rusty-knives
The arabian and gypsy scales are really good for different sounding blues. Learn them.
haha good one, wait what? You're not actually serious right?

The 'gypsy' scale is characterised by raising the 4 to a #4. Blues uses a natural fourth for a more consonant non-chord tone.

Arabian scales use a microtonal system. Very not bluesy.

Blues is pentatonics with added accidentals all the way.