#1
so I have a pretty cheap Jasmine dreadnought that I feel like doing something to.

I am thinking that if I sand and remove the clear coat from my acoustic, it will possibly give it a more natural, warmer, and louder tone.

Is my theory correct or am I about to destroy this guitar?
#2
It will give a little bit more tone, but probably not enough for you to notice. Wouldn't bother doing it if I were you, but if you really want to then go ahead. Could be fun.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#3
Yeah I really dont have a lot to lose, and I do love older looking guitars so this might make it look a little more vintage, will it be okay with out a clear coat? like will it become damaged from moisture?
#4
It will be really difficult to keep the guitar clean after you sand off the finish. Any sweat and oils from your skin will be absorbed right into the wood, and any dirt will get embedded right into the wood fibers. Your guitar will look like a grimy piece of junk in no time. If that's what you mean by "vintage," then go ahead. IMO, it sounds like a dumb idea.
#6
No, you're not dumb, just uninformed is all. There's another aspect of the finish on guitar that no one's mentioned. As the clear coat cures, it tends to shrink a tad. This shrinking causes the wood to become taut, rather like a drumhead. It's this aspect of it that lends to the tone and projection of the guitar, not only for aesthetics. Excellent hand made guitars go through as much finishing care as they do the build itself. Careful applications of the correct finish can indeed enhance the tone of a guitar. Too much and it'll dampen down the sound, like putting a towel over the guitar. Too little and there won't be enough there to protect the wood.
#7
When I was going through my mandolin phase (this is related, so hang in there) I found that a couple of my mando's had necks that felt a tad "sticky" when I played em.

I thought I'd like to sand the neck and smooth out the sliding action.

Although I never actually did this, I figured that it would work, but the re-sale value stopped me from actually doing it. (I was on the verge of selling off the mando's and giving up that exploration of sound).

If you have "an ole beater" guitar, and you want to experiment with it by sanding it.....I say "go for it" UNLESS you are planning on selling it. If indeed it won't change the tone much (you could probably change to a heavier string set and improve tone somewhat, as well), it may not be worth it, but I understand the desire to try it.

Worst case, you end up with a guitar that looks used, and that's not a bad thing. Look at guitars like Willie Nelson's for example.....holes, stains, signatures, all sorts of maladies....but he keeps it and plays it on stage. It has "character."

If you have a backup guitar that you play "out" or "more regularly," go ahead and sand....but if that is your primary axe, I'd wait til you have a backup.

How about just sanding the neck with some light-gauge sandpaper, (almost, but not quite "down to the wood") and see how the slide improves????

Obviously I'm not against trying something to see what it does, but just give yourself an "out" if you don't like the end result (like a second guitar).

My thoughts.....
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
#8
Hey thank you all for your comments, even tho some of you warned me about messing it up and stuff like that, I went ahead and did it anyways.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQMZPrgeGPo

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here is a video, showing the difference I am not sure if you can tell the difference, on the computer, but I actually think that I am gonna start playing this guitar a lot more now.
#9
Umm... I watched the vid and the truss rod is definitely NOT for action adjustments. It's for bowing problems only.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#10
Not bad -- I'm surprised it only took you two hours to sand off the clear coat. Maybe slap a thin coat of tung oil on it to protect it from grime -- might want to seal the soundboard first. If you're happy with it, that's great!
#11
I'm glad you had the backup guitar, and it does sound fuller since you sanded it.

"Individualism is the next step to uniqueness." (and you can "quote" me)
"I was so much older then; I'm younger than that now"

Epiphone EJ200
Epiphone AJ500ME
Epiphone Hummingbird
Washburn J28SDL
Guild GAD25NAT
#12
what grit sandpaper did you use? Did you sand the back of the neck? I have an old beater I think I might try this on too!
#13
haha sadly i dont even know what grit it was, but I used an air sander thats why it only took 2 hours, I say start out with a rough sand paper, then go to something softer.
try to find some kind of mechanical sander cause if you do it by hand your arm will fall off.

and No I did not touch the neck or the head stock, I think its good to leave the clear coat there, cause my hands sweat, and that neck would soak it right up, with out it.