#1
I know it may sound like a wierd question but i was thinking about this today. I know that drummers obviously need to know alot about the timing and dynamics part of theory, but would learning about keys and scales etc help a drummer in a band in any way? I was thinking it could get our drummer more involved in the creative side of our band as at the moment, me and my other guitarist are just making riffs and some songs, and the drummers just tries to play a beat that he think goes best with it.

Anyone thought about this? Or am i going slightly mad.
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#2
It's good to be in a band with like a common instrument that like, everyone can play.

Piano and guitar work well, so you can convey ideas to each other.
Singing melodys to each other work aswell, and seeing how the voice is not constrained by scale, you can come up with some really cool ideas. But you will need to transcribe them for your instruments.

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#3
Teach him the chromatic scale. Then have him buy hoop spacers for the bottom rims of his toms, then teach him to tune chromatically using the mic on a chromatic tuner. I did it with my drums so that I have DBGECA from highest to lowest, which allows me to form power chords between d and G, b and E, g and C, & e and A. Sounds very good and beefy. He might have to tune differently though because of the number of drums and their sizes.
Gear:
Ibanez RG7321 Seven String
Epiphone Iommi Signature SG
Digitech Scott Ian Black 13
VOX Valvetronix AD100VTH
Laney 4x12 w/Celestion 50s
#4
Quote by Dog454
Teach him the chromatic scale. Then have him buy hoop spacers for the bottom rims of his toms, then teach him to tune chromatically using the mic on a chromatic tuner. I did it with my drums so that I have DBGECA from highest to lowest, which allows me to form power chords between d and G, b and E, g and C, & e and A. Sounds very good and beefy. He might have to tune differently though because of the number of drums and their sizes.


Hha that sounds awesome gotta try that.

Suppose you could almost make a song like that?
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#5
Quote by nugiboy
Hha that sounds awesome gotta try that.

Suppose you could almost make a song like that?


I have done it a couple of times with my band. I usually utilize the Ae chord because it sounds just straight brutal.
Gear:
Ibanez RG7321 Seven String
Epiphone Iommi Signature SG
Digitech Scott Ian Black 13
VOX Valvetronix AD100VTH
Laney 4x12 w/Celestion 50s
#6
Knowing tonal theory will always help you, no matter what instrument you play. For drums it will allow him to understand what everyone else is doing.
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#8
Lol at Biozzo's drums et^

On topic:

I know it helps alot for a guitarplayer to understand drum rhythms and grooves.

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