#1
well... here's the idea (my band's goal for the next year)
we have pretty deacent music, at least we were told so... anyway we think it's enough of recording these ****ty demos and so on... we want to publish something like a SINGLE/EP or whatever is this thing called in english... basicly 5 tracks properly recorded, mixed, mastered etc...

the things we would need to do are the following:
1 pick 5 GOOD songs (should not be a problem since we have a lot of music)
2 find a studio (we live in this town where there are only 2 studios, so... )
3 find this producer guy (the one who you make the idea of the sound with)-> recording, mixing, mastering
4 publish it somehow (on our own? a label?...)

well let's go on to the costs

Studio - should be cheap or maybe even for free since i know this guy who owns it personally...
Producer - i dont know anything about costs here... so please, if you have any expirience with producers etc let me know how much would one cost (along with mixing and producing)
Publishing - again, i dont know anything about this.... not just the costs... about the whole publishing thing...

i imagine it's something like this; i send demos to the record label and if they like it they can publish it for you... however i dont know... how much do you have to pay for it? and so on...

so thanks in advice UG =)
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#2
so i asked on this other website where this guy offered me 1200€ for recording + mastering, mixing or 800€ for mixing and mastering only...

is this a good deal?
what should i be careful of when picking the right producer?
Quote by Moggan13
Serjem is like a Bishops testicals: Swollen
ಠ_ಠ
IIIIfb * KARKOLI * ytIIII(mostly rock... a little funky, a little hard just the way you want it )
#3
Quote by Serjem


well let's go on to the costs

Studio - should be cheap or maybe even for free since i know this guy who owns it personally...
Producer - i dont know anything about costs here... so please, if you have any expirience with producers etc let me know how much would one cost (along with mixing and producing)
Publishing - again, i dont know anything about this.... not just the costs... about the whole publishing thing...

i imagine it's something like this; i send demos to the record label and if they like it they can publish it for you... however i dont know... how much do you have to pay for it? and so on...

so thanks in advice UG =)


Studio - One thing i will say, is even though you are friends with the owner, still be prepared and make sure that you are able to pay full rate for all the studio time that you use. Some studios simply cannot afford to give away free time as for them, time is a lot of money.Friendship with someone high up always helps in various ways but no one can truly work for free.

Find out what facilities are at each studio and compare.

Producer - I would imagine it a good idea to contact the studio, and if possible one or two local bands who have used the spaces, to find out what local producers are in there most often, what peoples opinions are and how much it cost them. Getting an idea of who's doing what round your area and if anyone else likes it is great preparation.

It may be an engineer in studio who will know a lot about mixing who helps you through getting a good mix of your tracks, and may even help you out with some mastering if time and money allows. Extra mixing time is really worth paying for if you want to make your songs that bit more polished.

Publishing - This is where i know least, and ill readily admit it. Its first and formost important to ensure one thing - that you own 100 percent of the copyright to all of your songs.

Nowadays releasing an album or EP digitally is becoming a viable alternative to physical distribution.Not saying that they will take over any time soon, but a lot of people nowadays seem to be happy to miss out on having a physical copy. Ensuring you have complete control over your songs will help when it comes to selling them. Websites such as CDbaby have a good reputation for helping out unsigned artists who need to get their work out there.

Good luck
#4
Quote by Serjem
so i asked on this other website where this guy offered me 1200€ for recording + mastering, mixing or 800€ for mixing and mastering only...

is this a good deal?
what should i be careful of when picking the right producer?



If your band has good gear and good recording equipment then I reckon go for the cheaper option of just mixing and mastering.

If you in least way doubt your recording skills and equipment then save your pennies a bit longer for the whole lot.
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Quote by ShadesOfNight
I'm not a sadistic person, but I'd like to pull the wings off every fly in the world so they all starve to death or get eaten alive by spiders

#5
Quote by Serjem

Studio - should be cheap or maybe even for free since i know this guy who owns it personally...


I'll support the idea of 'don't make any assumptions.' Pro studios are closing up shop all the time. It's hard to make enough money to survive a business on, and they might be looking at it as, "hey, they know us, so they chose us over the other sudios.... hoooray, we'll get to eat this week!" Of course, you may well have lucked right in...

Quote by Serjem

Producer - i dont know anything about costs here... so please, if you have any expirience with producers etc let me know how much would one cost (along with mixing and producing)


Most studios have a person or people who will work with you to get your tunes sounding their best. There can be a fine line between engineer and producer. A producer will help you re-write and re-arrange and re-orchestrate your tunes so they are presented the best they can be. An engineer will not do that. A producer will give you performance suggestions as you go. An engineer might do that too. Both producers and engineers *should* know what mics to use, where to put them, various recording techniques, use of effects and EQ, etc.

A producer, like a guitarist, can be anyone from your mom's friend from work who knows a little bit but has no experience to speak of, but might work for free, to someone like Mutt Lange or Brendan O'Brien or Bob Rock who won't even return your call unless you have solid representation and the means to pay them a handy sum.

If you're looking for a producer, talk to other bands whose tunes you like the sound of. A lot of them tend to have a 'signature sound'. You can spot a Mutt Lange production from a mile away, and when you hear something and find out it was produced by Bob Rock, you're never surprised. Word of mouth and having access to samples of their work is a producer's best advertising. Nobody looks up Brenden O'Brien in the Yellow Pages.

Quote by Serjem

Publishing - again, i dont know anything about this.... not just the costs... about the whole publishing thing...

i imagine it's something like this; i send demos to the record label and if they like it they can publish it for you... however i dont know... how much do you have to pay for it? and so on...

so thanks in advice UG =)


This is a *huge* question. Publishing means different things to different people. When people talk about 'signing over your publishing,' they are referring to publishing as your copyright. Technically, to publish something means roughly, 'to make it available to the public.'

To publish, as in to make it available to the public, you just need to make a bunch of copies and start giving them away, or selling them. A record company will help you with this (if they choose to) on a rather huge scale. It can cost as little as the price of the disks that you burn yourself, to about $2/disk if you get a small-ish run of CDs manufactured, shrink-wrapped, etc. And then there is the enormous expense of marketing and promotion....

To publish, as in to have copyright, you get that much for free... at least initially. It might cost you to formally register a copyright, but technically, your work is copyrighted at the moment it is committed to a fixed media. (paper, CD, etc.)

If you sign to a label, a traditional deal will assign 50% of your publishing to the record company. This includes ownership of the song and the *publishing royalties* (the money paid to the copyright holder is paid for use of the song) that are payable as a result. This is where the term 'signing over your publishing comes from. Although this sounds like a foolish thing to do, it comes down to 'does the reward justify the cost?' If you didn't sign to a record label, you might sell, say, 5 000 copies on your own. (and by most indie band standards, that represents a terrific success) At $10 a piece, that's $50 000 dollars... all on your own!! But!! If the album is good enough to sell that many copies independently, maybe it would be quite successful with label support behind it. Maybe you'd only wind up getting $1 per unit sold (after the myriad of other expenses, deductions, recoupables, etc.), but if you sold 100 000 copies, you'd get $100 000.... that's twice as much!! Sure, it cost you half of your publishing, but look what you got in return!

Of course, the music industry is a crap-shoot. You might get signed, assign away half of your publishing, have the label decide not to support your band and subsequently bury the CD even before it gets released. They'll buy out the rest of your contract so you break even, and you still only own half of your own songs.

Because you never can tell how much something is going to sell... you are playing the lottery of sorts.... but you have to realize that the record labels are too. Record labels lose tons of money on bands that don't meet sales expectations. To use a Canadian example, it is bands like Celine Dion and the Tragically Hip that allow the labels to take a chance on a band like Billy Talent. In that case, the label won and got a good-selling artist. It is those same bands that allow the label to take a chance on someone like Priestess, Jersey, Marble Index, etc. who surely would have lost the label some money. (at least I fully expect) Or even bands like Everclear (I know... not Canadian) who used to make money, but find themselves making a record that radio doesn't readily get behind, or listeners don't readily get behind, and as a result, sales wind up much flatter than expected.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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