#1
The majority of my soloing is minor pentatonic, and I've noticed by watching some of my favorite guitar players that they still play notes that are outside of the scale. Now, if I've learned correctly, these are called accidentals, so my question is:

Is figuring out which accidentals to use a hit or miss thing? Or is there a way for me to know which ones are availible. I've read that the b5 is good, I just haven't found a context to use it in.
#2
Accidentals are sharps and flats. Outside notes are simply outside notes. Yeah using the b5 will make your minor pentatonic become the 'blues' scale. I think its best to get a grasp of major scale harmony and the workings of that before worrying about using outside notes. I wouldnt say its something to worry about much when concerned with the pentatonic scale with no knowledge of the major scale etc. Are you sure these notes outside the scale arent actually the other 2 notes added onto the minor pentatonic to make it in the 7 note minor scale?
Andy
#3
accidentals are just sharps and flats, but anyway, besides a b5 making the pentatonic a blues scale you can use notes that are just outside of a scale note and bend it up, like if you play on a C pentatonic, major or minor, there is no B on the actual scale but you can hit a b and bend it to a C wich is the tonic

is sounds quite "powerful", its a way to use a note thats not on the scale
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i got tired of my signature and i no longer has one

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#4
For example, one of my favorite things to do:

|---5h8p5-------------------------------------------|
|-------------8p5-------------------------------------|
|-------------------7-5---------------5-----7-7-5----|
|-------------------------7--5h6h7-----7----------7-|
|-------------------------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------------------------|


Is the Ab on the D string an accidental?
#5
Quote by TheGallowsPole
For example, one of my favorite things to do:

|---5h8p5-------------------------------------------|
|-------------8p5-------------------------------------|
|-------------------7-5---------------5-----7-7-5----|
|-------------------------7--5h6h7-----7----------7-|
|-------------------------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------------------------|


Is the Ab on the D string an accidental?


thats the A minor pentatonic, yes the Ab is an accidental BUT its called an accidental because of the flat (bemol), its wrong to call accidental a note outside a scale

you can just call it a "passing note" from G to A
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i got tired of my signature and i no longer has one

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#7
Quote by TheGallowsPole
Is figuring out which accidentals to use a hit or miss thing? Or is there a way for me to know which ones are availible. I've read that the b5 is good, I just haven't found a context to use it in.
Definitely not a hit and miss thing. In jazz, some guys have a range of accidentals in their head and they make a mental note of how that accidental sounds in melodic (what's played before and after this accidental) and harmonic (what chord is this accidental played over) context.

You usually use accidental as dissonance to spice up a solo.

Generally you can use anything as a passing tone, as in, play an accidental and resolve that note upwards by a semitone or tone to a chord tone or a pentatonic note.

Some accidental sound best as chromatic runs. Like using a note (major seventh) in between a minor seventh (to the chord) and a root is very common in jazz. As in, say we're playing over an E chord, you might resolve a phrase by playing a run like this: D, D#, E (resolve).

You don't even need to resolve some accidentals (not really). As long as you play chord tones over stressed beats (AKA first beat of every bar) you'll still sound pretty right.

Experiment and learn your theory so you can make a mental note of which accidentals sound good to you. Learn to name accidentals by the interval they make with the chord playing, so you can apply the same accidental to any other chords of the same quality. IE, you can use the same accidentals over Gm if you found these accidentals over Am.
Accidentals are sharps and flats.
I'm pretty sure T/S is talking about accidentals as out of scale notes.
#8
You could use a Hybrid scale? which is basically pentatonic with the blues note and some chromatics

I know thats not very helpful detail wise but im sure its about on UG somewhere!
Last edited by Zanon at Nov 29, 2008,
#9
An accidental is a sharp or flat that makes a difference to a piece of music being in a minor or a major key... right? (someone correct me if I'm wrong)

A note outside the scale would be... perhaps a note to pass from one scale to another to follow the chord sequence?
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