#1
I've been working on a piece of music for a while now and I'm totally stuck for chords (I think it's just one of those phases) and I'm reluctant to let it rest this time.

The main progression/theme: | C | F | G | F |

I was after a little mid section before returning to the main riff but can't seem to complete it. I intend on keeping the mood of the song upbeat and happy. I came up with:

| G | Am | D/F# |

I want to end on a G7 as it leads nicely back in to the C chord of the main progression.

Anybody got any suggestions?

Thanks
#2
c f g f g am d/f# (i think you may be breaking some rules here but if you like it just go for it)

Try fooling around with D7 leading to G7 (sus7's are always dope) and then a 7b5 leading back to the tonic
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#4
Have you tried going right from D/F# to G7, then to C?
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#5
Towards the end go, F | F# | G | G# | A

And then do the norm progression but in the key of D : D | G | A | G

For a cheesy upkey!
#6
| G | Am | D/F# |


I'm not by an instrument right now, but I'll suggest...

G | Am | F | C/G | G7

The C/G is a tonic chord in the second inversion. It functions vaguely like a secondary dominant (though it is not a secondary dominant) and both strongly establish the key and resolves to the dominant (the G7), which then finally resolves to the tonic.
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#7
Thanks for the suggestions guys - I might leave the "cheesy upkey" til the end of the song as it would no doubt suit the happy kinda mood I'm going for.

The D/F# to G7 feels a bit to sudden, I wanted to stretch the mid section out a little longer maybe have it as 8 chord changes instead of 4.

Cheers
#8
Seeing as theres actually no answer and all this is up for personal taste

I'd suggest this: D/F# Dm/G G7 C
I like it, I don't think I like the repeated G root though.

Or maybe if you cleverly voice a neapolitan chord (bii):
D/F# Db/F G7 C
I like the chromatic run like movement in all parts between the D and Db chords. I don't like that it lessens the resolve and sounds so anti-jazz and un-laidback.

Personally I don't think D/F# - G7 sounds that bad. It's a V/V - V movement which is common in classical and jazz.

I might post more suggestions if I sober up.
#9
Gone to songwriters, every one.

Quote by Archeo Avis

The C/G is a tonic chord in the second inversion. It functions vaguely like a secondary dominant (though it is not a secondary dominant) and both strongly establish the key and resolves to the dominant (the G7), which then finally resolves to the tonic.


It's a cadential 6/4 (V6/4 - 5/3). Functions as an appogiatura.


Anyway why not modulate? Have the G Am D/F# D7 then play the main progression in G - G C D C, then just hit G hard for a while, go back to the main progression.

Just sing it out, try to hear something. Try to get the sound you hear.
#10
It's a cadential 6/4 (V6/4 - 5/3). Functions as an appogiatura.


I know that. The purpose of the tonic 6/4 is to prepare the dominant, which is all he really needed to know in this case.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
I'm not by an instrument right now, but I'll suggest...

G | Am | F | C/G | G7

ooo, what a great oppurtunity for a pedal 5. G in the bass with F makes the resolution so much sweeter. Stolen...muhaha
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