#1
How do i 'study' a song? I decided to try learn most of stabwound by necrophagist to look at how he's used theory to make the song, but i'm stuck.
I think its in D minor, mostly harmonic minor but all the scale runs are in a different scale altogether and the arpeggios don't all fit in the key.
They constantly change time signature, i don't know how i can use that in my music because whenever i write something it ends up in 6/8, 9/8 or a standard 4/4 time signature, usually keeping the same one for most of the song.

So, i guess what I'm trying to say is, what could i look at when 'studying' songs? am i doing it completely wrong?

I also hear people say that necrophagist have alot of complex chord progressions, but i can see two guitar parts playing a riff and the bass mostly following the guitars. wheres the chord progression? I'm a newb when it comes to chords in general

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#3
Necrophagist's compositions are rather complex, as they contain elements of classical music and what not. They are difficult to study because there are so many changes in time and key signatures. i suggest studying different sections and then putting them together, breaking up songs like Necrophagist's is highly recommended.


also, they do have complex chord progressions because nearly everything in their music is written in a diminished key.
Last edited by 145186 at Nov 28, 2008,
#4
also, they do have complex chord progressions because nearly everything in their music is written in a diminished key.


Que?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by 145186
Necrophagist's compositions are rather complex, as they contain elements of classical music and what not. They are difficult to study because there are so many changes in time and key signatures. i suggest studying different sections and then putting them together, breaking up songs like Necrophagist's is highly recommended.


also, they do have complex chord progressions because nearly everything in their music is written in a diminished key.


blue: i have done that because when i started i wasn't too good at sweep tapping, so i just looked at the rhythm parts at the time. if the key signature changes often then i guess i will have to look riff at a time and find the key signature of each riff then?

red: ahah! if its in a diminished scale i think i understand the scale runs and stuff then. but i still don't see a chord progression in there at all.

EDIT: by diminished key you mean whole half/ half whole scales right?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#6
First of all. Necrophagist is sickening hard to play. That guy seriously lived in a woodshed with just a guitar for 10 years or something.

I suggest getting familiar with some odd time signatures, or else you will be stuck very soon, or ur accents will totally be out of place.

A very good old mate of mine is a very good drummer. And he gave me rudiments from time to time. These are rhythmic exercizes for drums (snare drum), but you can change the drums in notes, or chords, it's for ur right hand anyway.

Words can't describe how much those helped (and still helping) me with understanding rhythms in general and odd time signatures.

Go to a drum site, and search for odd time signature rudiments. I swear, it will help so much, and it's quite fun to do also.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 28, 2008,
#7
Look at this way. You're already learning.

You know
- how to create disconcerting rhythmic effects by constantly changing time sigs.
- that out of key arpeggios and scale runs can be awesome.
- a huge pile of fingerings the above.

See?
#8
Quote by Freepower
Look at this way. You're already learning.

You know
- how to create disconcerting rhythmic effects by constantly changing time sigs.
- that out of key arpeggios and scale runs can be awesome.
- a huge pile of fingerings the above.

See?


thats a good point, i just wrote a pretty cool lick (wheres that lick thread gone now...) using the whole half diminished scale, but its in 4/4 timing, something i try to avoid to stop sounding to ordinary :/

also, knowing that knowing theory just to use things that go against what ive learn't is meant to sound good to sound good really doesn't encourage me

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#9
Analyze the harmonic progression and dictate the form.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#10
Xiaoxi, care to explain what that means? I'm a theory noob with a bit of knowledge of scales and arpeggios and that's about it

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#11
Quote by metallicafan616
but its in 4/4 timing, something i try to avoid to stop sounding to ordinary :/

Don't do something "unordinary" just for the sake of doing it, that's just idiotic

Try to make something sound GOOD first
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#12
Quote by metallicafan616
Xiaoxi, care to explain what that means? I'm a theory noob with a bit of knowledge of scales and arpeggios and that's about it

Analyzing the harmonic progression includes finding the key(s) the piece of music is in and figuring out the function of every chord in relations to each other and the key. Some useful applications of this includes playing a tune in a different key than the original and altering the tune to your liking. Form analysis is figuring out the "shape" of the music by noting the sections of the music and how they are arranged. You can then take these sections and create your own arrangements.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#13
If you can find a decent video of it being played, it helps a lot. Anything you miss, you can figure out on your own. The rest is just practice.

But if you want to figure it out completely on your own, I have no idea how to help. I know very little about theory.