#1
I'm fairly new to the guitar (2 years), and I've had some questions bugging me:

What is a C-neck, V-neck, etc? Where is this C or V shape?

How do better pickups reflect on the sound? I've only consistently played on my SG special (which I would assume has ****ty ass pickups), and when I play it connected to my amp, I sometimes dislike the tone (too sharp or rough sounding). I always thought this was just because of old strings or maybe the amp (vypyr 15). Now, I'm starting to think its probably the pickups? The best way to test this would be to run a good guitar through my amp, but seeing as I don't have one, I can only guess.

Why do some people prefer rosewood fretboards to maple, and other things like that. Why does the wood type matter on the fretboard? On the body, I can understand that it would affect sustain, tone, etc. However, for the neck, I can only think that one would allow your fingers to have less friction? Wouldn't this be negligible due to the gloss or whatever? Also, if one was always faster than another type of wood, why is there so much variation?

Why do people prefer 22 or even 21 frets? Aren't 24 always better?

Finally, a more personal question - is it worth buying new pickups for my Epi sg special?

Thanks for all the help, and I apologize if these questions have been answered elsewhere.
#2
Quote by fnmpm
I'm fairly new to the guitar (2 years), and I've had some questions bugging me:

What is a C-neck, V-neck, etc? Where is this C or V shape?

How do better pickups reflect on the sound? I've only consistently played on my SG special (which I would assume has ****ty ass pickups), and when I play it connected to my amp, I sometimes dislike the tone (too sharp or rough sounding). I always thought this was just because of old strings or maybe the amp (vypyr 15). Now, I'm starting to think its probably the pickups? The best way to test this would be to run a good guitar through my amp, but seeing as I don't have one, I can only guess.

Why do some people prefer rosewood fretboards to maple, and other things like that. Why does the wood type matter on the fretboard? On the body, I can understand that it would affect sustain, tone, etc. However, for the neck, I can only think that one would allow your fingers to have less friction? Wouldn't this be negligible due to the gloss or whatever? Also, if one was always faster than another type of wood, why is there so much variation?

Why do people prefer 22 or even 21 frets? Aren't 24 always better?

Finally, a more personal question - is it worth buying new pickups for my Epi sg special?

Thanks for all the help, and I apologize if these questions have been answered elsewhere.


A C-Shape or V-Shape is the cross section of the neck when you slice it. C is pretty much the standard, U is common in some ESP/LTD guitars.

The Vypyr is a good amp. I'd check the Vypyr thread to see how people EQ theirs / what modes they use to get different sounds out of.

I'm with you on the fretboard question. It really doesn't matter to me, but I've never played an ebony fretboard (which lots of metal players prefer).

I think 21/22 fret guitars give you slightly more sustain. But only use that if you don't use frets 21-22, because 24 frets means much better access to those frets.

I'm checking the pickups of ur guitar at the moment.
#3
Quote by fnmpm
I'm fairly new to the guitar (2 years), and I've had some questions bugging me:

What is a C-neck, V-neck, etc? Where is this C or V shape?

How do better pickups reflect on the sound? I've only consistently played on my SG special (which I would assume has ****ty ass pickups), and when I play it connected to my amp, I sometimes dislike the tone (too sharp or rough sounding). I always thought this was just because of old strings or maybe the amp (vypyr 15). Now, I'm starting to think its probably the pickups? The best way to test this would be to run a good guitar through my amp, but seeing as I don't have one, I can only guess.

Why do some people prefer rosewood fretboards to maple, and other things like that. Why does the wood type matter on the fretboard? On the body, I can understand that it would affect sustain, tone, etc. However, for the neck, I can only think that one would allow your fingers to have less friction? Wouldn't this be negligible due to the gloss or whatever? Also, if one was always faster than another type of wood, why is there so much variation?

Why do people prefer 22 or even 21 frets? Aren't 24 always better?

Finally, a more personal question - is it worth buying new pickups for my Epi sg special?

Thanks for all the help, and I apologize if these questions have been answered elsewhere.

Those neck types affect the back of the neck where your palm and thumb are. V's are a little deeper and more "pointed", C-Neck is more typical neck shape. It comes down to personal opinion.

It's not your pickups, it's your modeling amp which causes that.

Again, fingerboard would is up the the person, I personally like maple, many players prefer rosewood. Maple makes it a little snappier; rosewood makes it a little warmer.

The number of frets usually depends on the guitar maker. Fender traditionally had 21 frets, so you'll see many strats like that. There is no reason for this, but it's rare that you'll need 24. Even if you have 21 frets it's possible to go higher using harp harmonic etc.

No it is not worth buying new pickups for. I say this because it would be better just to upgrade guitars.
Last edited by Dirty_Civilian at Nov 28, 2008,
#4
Okay, it has Epiphone humbuckers, so they probably aren't very good.

The amp is more than half of your tone (assuming you have no pedals or anything like that). But as I said before, the Vypyr is pretty good.

For the guitar portion of the tone, here's what counts:
body wood (both type and quality)
pickups
neck wood (somewhat)

Here's what to do, in my opinion, before you spend any money on new pickups.

1) Check the Vypyr thread and try using other peoples' settings for the stuff you play. Play with your pickup selector / tone controls on the guitar and try to get a nice sound out of it.

2) If it still sounds bad after you've tried lots of different things on your amp, consider upgrading guitar or pickups. We need more info to recommend which one, but if you like the feel and look of the guitar, pickups wouldn't be a bad choice. Make sure you play it unamplified (and preferably with new strings) to hear the natural tone of the guitar wood. If it sounds bad, new pickups aren't really going to help.

Or you could just buy a new guitar. But as I said, first try tweaking your settings and if that doesn't work post your budget/style of music. I'd recommend buying a new guitar over new pickups for sure, because you're eventually going to upgrade guitars anyway (if you stick with it / join a band / whatever). When you have a good guitar and amp, then upgrading pickups makes a lot of difference.
#5
Wow, thanks for the great replies, both of you. I actually went to GC to pick up a schecter c-1+ today, but they were sold out .

After that, I spent a few hours wondering if the c-1+ was the right guitar for me. I really liked how it felt when I played it, and the easy access to the higher frets was an added benefit. However, I play all sorts of music (RHCP, RATM, Tool, Metallica, Paul Gilbert, Rush, Buckethead, Ozzy), and I'm not a hardcore metal player. Right now, I'm looking for a versatile guitar with the most bang for its buck. I have no experience with fender, but I heard the Jimmie Vaughan MIM Strat was awesome, as well as Telecaster MIM. I guess the best bet would be to go to a GC, sit down and try all these out. So that begs the question, how? Do I just sit down and noodle, and get a "feel" for what I like? Will I easily hear the difference between a regular strat and a MIM running through the same amp?

The other option is to keep playing on my SG special, but I feel that it may be holding me back. No doubt its an awesome beginner's guitar, but maybe I'd progress faster if I upgraded?
#6
Bump and extra question.

I read that MIMs vary (sometimes significantly) even if they're the same model. How would I know I'm getting a good one?