#1
i have this Global acoustic guitar and its like 15-20 years old it, it used to be my moms
anyway its extremely hard to play so i tried lowering the action on it
now the action needs to go a little lower for me to have the neck where i want it to be but if i go any lower there starts to be an obscene amount of fret buzz
can i fix the fret buzz by simply changing strings after i finish lowering the action?
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#2
Well, lighter strings will be easier to press down, but they won't necessarily stop the fret buzz. My question is how did you lower the action? Acoustics are harder to play than electrics, so that is to be expected, but did you take the guitar to a luthier or repair place to get it set up and the action adjusted, or did you attempt to do it yourself? If you did it yourself, how did you do it? Don't adjust the truss rod, for some reason people think that is for fixing the action but it is not!

If you want it set up properly take it to a repair place.
#3
i cant take it to a repair place at the moment so i just attempted to adjust the truss rod because its all i could think of doing, and i think the strings are standard acoustic strings and i dont want to go lighter than standard if i dont have to

other than a repair shop is there any way i might further adjust the action on my own than just messing with the truss rod?
because i love the way this guitar looks and sounds and i dont think they make Globals anymore so i kind of want to make this playable again
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#4
well the fret buzz IS coming from your truss rod adjustment^
you should probably put it back to wear it was at before it started buzzing.
try this, check out the distance from the top of the first fret to the bottom of you E string (bass E). keep that distance in mind. now push down that e on the first fret and check the distance between the top of the second fret and the bottom of that string, if it is a smaller distance than you need to get your nut adjusted.
if its the same and you've got your truss rod adjusted so it doesn't buzz but its stillnot bowed to much than your problem is the bridge, which you would need to get adjusted by a profesional.
#5
if you can't get it adjust right now all you can do is put on some 10's or something and then adjust so it doesn't buzz
i've had to do that before its really annoying though, not fun at all to play. /:
#6
[quote="'[DookieShoes"]']well the fret buzz IS coming from your truss rod adjustment^
you should probably put it back to wear it was at before it started buzzing.
try this, check out the distance from the top of the first fret to the bottom of you E string (bass E). keep that distance in mind. now push down that e on the first fret and check the distance between the top of the second fret and the bottom of that string, if it is a smaller distance than you need to get your nut adjusted.
if its the same and you've got your truss rod adjusted so it doesn't buzz but its stillnot bowed to much than your problem is the bridge, which you would need to get adjusted by a profesional.
ite thanks
right now the truss rod is set just before the "buzzing point" so its a little easier to play but yeah still not quite where i want it
i did what you said and there wasnt any noticeable change in distance on the e string so im assuming the bridge is the problem

im obviously going to let a professional handle it but just curious how would one go about fixing the bridge on an acoustic? from looking im not really sure what they would do
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#7
They will file down the slots that your strings go through in the bridge so that they are lower, it is pretty straight forward, but don't try it yourself unless you have training
#8
ahhh yes i think me attempting that would be a bad idea lol
ill get it taken in as soon as i can convince my parents to spend the money as I (like most amateur musicians) am flat broke
thanks for the help guys
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You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
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#9
so I still havent found time to bring the guitar in yet, but recently when messing with it I found that there are 2 flathead screws on each side of the bridge, so instead of paying to get the slots in the bridge filed down, could I fix my action by messing with these bridge-screws?

If no one is sure then I guess I should probably not touch it...
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#10
Quote by ReChord
They will file down the slots that your strings go through in the bridge so that they are lower, it is pretty straight forward, but don't try it yourself unless you have training


What? No. Wrong. What slots in the bridge are you talking about? Maybe you're confused with the slots in the nut? The bridge is the dark wood stationary object glued to the soundboard of the guitar. In it will be a bridge saddle. This is usually white(ish) in color. This is THE PRIMARY action height adjusting point on acoustic guitars.
#11
Quote by zegreatdane
so I still havent found time to bring the guitar in yet, but recently when messing with it I found that there are 2 flathead screws on each side of the bridge, so instead of paying to get the slots in the bridge filed down, could I fix my action by messing with these bridge-screws?

If no one is sure then I guess I should probably not touch it...



Yes, that is where you would adjust the action on that type of bridge. Those screws will raise/lower the saddle. That's the part that the strings are actually resting on and is usually a whitish color piece of either bone or man made material. By tightening those screws, you would bring that saddle piece up higher, thus raising the action. Opposite if you loosen the screws. You really aren't tightening/loosening anything by turning those screws. You are simply raising/lowering the height of the saddle.
Try this. Loosen the tension on all of the strings until they are just about slack. You can retune later. Somehow mark the position of both of the screws on the bridge so you know where you are starting at. A little dot from a marker maybe. Slowly turn one of them one way or the other and watch what happens with the saddle piece. It should either lift or lower in the slot it sit's in in the bridge. There's your test to see if these actually do what I'm telling you they do. I'm relatively certain they do, but for your own peace of mind, try it for yourself.
Now then. You want to lower the action I believe? Take it slow, and turn each one the same amount, maybe counterclockwise 1/2 a turn each. Retune the guitar and see how it is. If you went too far and now have fret buzz all over the place, then loosen the strings again and raise them back up by half the amount you first turned them, for a total of 1/4 turn each. If the strings on only the bass side seem too high, only turn that screw, vice versa for the treble side. It's all pretty easy once you start messing with it. Remember to mark those screws somehow so you know where you started at and can put it back to that point if you mess up.
#12
thank ye very much dave I shall give that a try

Very nice explanation I think I should be able to get this done
Quote by altoidwithmelon
You dont lose your virginity, you voluntarily misplace it.

Quote by Ur all $h1t
You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

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#13
Hey, I have just answered this in another thread so I though I would tell you the same. I play bass guitar myself but I know of a cool website on how to set the action on a bass, I reckon it could help you too.
Setting up your action
Hope this helps.
#14
Wow apparently this thread got missed by everyone who actually knows what they are talking about until LeftyDave popped his head in yesterday.

Considering that you have already been messing with your truss rod, I would probably straighten out the neck before I even fooled with adjusting the saddle. It may already be straight, and if so then proceed as LeftyDave said.

To check it, put a capo on the first fret. Then fret the guitar at the 14th fret, or whatever fret the guitar's body starts. It will either be the 12th or 14th fret, but most likely the 14th. Now how much gap is there between the top of the 7th fret (if you're holding the 14th fret, use the 6th fret if you are holding the 12th fret) and the bottom of the low E string? If there is much of a gap there, then you're neck has too much relief. If the string is laying on top of the fret, then you probably don't have enough relief. I say probably because technically when your neck is perfectly straight, the string will just barely lay right across all the frets. Here is a diagram showing what I am talking about...



Now typically you want the neck to be either perfectly straight or to have a little bit of relief (a very, very small gap). If you have a large gap, then you will be tightening the truss rod, if the strings are laying across the frets so that your neck has backbow, then you will want to loosen the truss rod. Keep in mind that you want to go in small increments. Only about 1/8 of a turn at a time is all you need to do at once. Check the neck again between each adjustment to see where you are.

I recommend doing this before adjusting the action at the saddle since you have already been turning your truss rod. If you have too much bow in either direction, you aren't going to be able to achieve good action without buzzing no matter how much you adjust that saddle.
#15
^unfortunately I got started with the saddle before your post; I got the action noticeably better but still nowhere near where I would like it, so basically i just check the neck and work on straightening it back out and then possibly go and mess witht he saddle more?
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You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

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#16
so I did that check, and there is exactly enough space for a pick to fit between the 6th fret and the string, which Im assuming is the right amount? However theres still like hints of buzzing all over the board and the action is still a little uncomfortable
Quote by altoidwithmelon
You dont lose your virginity, you voluntarily misplace it.

Quote by Ur all $h1t
You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

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#17
what size pick do you use? picks come in lots of different thicknesses

Also, have you just started playing acoustic? Do you also play electric guitar?

What gauge are your strings?

What is your action? Measure from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of the low E string. Don't fret anything when you measure, and be precise. "About 2mm" isn't really a good measurement for action. I usually go down to at least 16ths of an inch if not 32nds when measuring action. You may not have a tool to measure this exactly though so do the best you can!
#18
hmm scratch that pick size measurement
so i took a ruler to it, and i got about 2 and a half 16ths of an inch measuring like you told me...not very good...and when i try to lower adjust the truss rod or saddle any lower the fret buzz gets much more noticeable :/
Quote by altoidwithmelon
You dont lose your virginity, you voluntarily misplace it.

Quote by Ur all $h1t
You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

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#19
Well you may have the action too low already. Adjust the neck to straight or almost straight with a very slight up bow. Then raise the action until the strings don't buzz at all. Then measure the action again from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of the low E string.

How low you can have your action also depends on playing style. The harder you strum, the higher your action is going to have to be to keep the guitar from buzzing.

The angle at which you strike the strings also affects this. You want to have the pick perfectly perpendicular to the top of the guitar when you hit strings. This causes the strings to vibrate parallel with the soundboard which will reduce buzz. If you are hitting the strings at an angle they will vibrate more perpendicular to the soundboard which will increase string buzz.

This isn't rocket science, but there are a lot of factors
#20
thanks for walking me through this jim, the guitars already twice as easy to play as when i started

now right now its handling my hardest strumming in E standard and Drop D fairly well, with minimal buzz, however i think the action could go a little lower but I can tell just from visual if the neck is bowed any direction, it looks fairly straight to me, and I can no longer move the truss rod in the direction that i was(counter-clockwise)

would slowly moving the truss rod back to clockwise give it the up-bow, or should i just leave it since it at least appears to be at straight right now
Quote by altoidwithmelon
You dont lose your virginity, you voluntarily misplace it.

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You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

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#21
would slowly moving the truss rod back to clockwise give it the up-bow, or should i just leave it since it at least appears to be at straight right now
Quote by altoidwithmelon
You dont lose your virginity, you voluntarily misplace it.

Quote by Ur all $h1t
You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

http://groups.ultimate-guitar.com/rabidpitweasels/
#22
No. I can see you still don't quite get how a truss rod works. I'll try to simplify it for you.

Think of an ordinary bow, as in a bow and arrow. No string on it, it's straightened out for the most part. To string it, you bend it into a severe curve, then hook the string on. Now it's at a nice curve like what you're used to seeing right? Ok, on a guitar neck, the strings are doing that very same thing to the neck, trying to pull it into that inward curve shape. But the truss rod is there to prevent that from happening. It does this by exerting a force on the neck in the opposite direction to the pull of the strings.
Got that so far?
So to give the neck/fretboard more relief, which is more inward bow, just like the bow and arrow, you would LOOSEN the truss rod, counterclockwise. By loosening it, you are allowing the strings to act on the neck with more force than before and the neck will give way a little and start to curve in on itself. If there's too much relief, then you would TIGHTEN the truss rod, clockwise, making it pull the neck straighter.
Do it slow, and only 1/8 to 1/4 turn at a time, with an overnight rest period for the neck to adapt to the changes. This part is huge. The effect on the neck from making a truss rod adjustment IS NOT immediate. It takes a little time to get there. This is perhaps why so many fail at making this adjustment, they think it'll do it's thing right away and when it doesn't, they crank on the truss rod more hoping to see better results. All of a sudden they have a broken neck or ruined truss rod on their hands. TAKE IT SLOW!
#23
****e...thanks dave thats what i needed to hear...um time for me to go slowly fix my truss rod and pray for a non-broken neck haha
damn i wish i could be patient in these matters
Quote by altoidwithmelon
You dont lose your virginity, you voluntarily misplace it.

Quote by Ur all $h1t
You should bottle up all of your emotions till they become a problem that requires professional help.
It's good for the economy.

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